Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, is pitching a $500 million program to help states and schools combat bullying.


Montana Superintendent Denise Juneau, who's running for Congress, has carried on a family legacy in education that has roots on the Blackfeet reservation.


There's no hard-and-fast evidence that Race to the Top, Obama administration's $4 billion, signature K-12 initiative had a long-term impact on student achievement or state policy, according to a report released Wednesday by the Institute for Education Sciences, the U.S. Department of Education's research arm.


Tax returns and confidential emails has come up more often than K-12 education this election season. But that actually has a big upside, some experts say.


Under ESSA, states and districts will get much more say when it comes to turning around their lowest performing schools.


If Democrats gain control in one or both chambers, who's likely to head the key K-12 committees in Congress? And what does that mean for education policy?


There's a change from the No Child Left Behind Act to the Every Student Succeeds Act in the calculation of how much Title I money districts must distribute to private schools for equitable services.


Conservative Leaders for Education is looking to add state lawmakers to influence the Every Student Succeeds Act in states and counterbalance the power of other groups like the teachers' unions.


Former Hillary Clinton aide Mildred Otero and Buffalo, N.Y. school board member Carl Paladino spoke about the candidates' views at a forum in Miami hosted by the Council of the Great City Schools Oct. 21.


To answer questions about the graduation-rate gap between groups of students, U.S. Secretary of Education John King went straight to the source: high school kids.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments