Legislation from one of President Donald Trump's most vocal critics in Congress is taking aim at how Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is handling civil rights issues.


Louisiana is the first state to get the all clear from the U.S. Department of Education to participate in the Every Student Succeeds Act's "Innovative Assessment" pilot.


Advocates for integration decried a recent move by the Trump administration to roll back racial diversity guidance, but praised efforts in Congress to promote the issue.


Educators fear of overstepping federal student privacy laws can make it tougher for law enforcement and schools to share information that could prevent a potential school shooting, experts said at the commission's latest hearing.


DeVos used a speech Wednesday to what was billed by organizers as the biggest gathering of conservative high school-aged activists in recent history to make the case for her signature policy: school choice.


Momentum behind reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act has grown in recent weeks, after a lobbying effort by the Trump administration on Capitol Hill.


Trauma-informed care and state support for mental health paid off big in Wisconsin, state and local officials told U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and other members of the Federal School Safety Commission at a field hearing.


The Democrats announced that their legislation would be a "sweeping reauthorization" of the nation's Higher Education Act. So what's in the bill?


Last reauthorized in 2006, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act is a $1.1 billion program that provides grants to states.


ESSA, like its predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act, requires states to test students in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school, in math and reading. But who foots the bill?


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