President Donald Trump signed into law spending legislation that provides a significant funding increase for the U.S. Department of Education.


Congress is about to nearly triple funding for the Every Student Succeeds Act's broad Title IV program, which districts can use for arts, music, physical education, science, and much more.


Congress has rebuffed President Donald Trump's proposed budget cut for fiscal 2018, and instead wants to spend $70.9 billion on the Education Department. But don't read too much into that number.


The omnibus spending bill rejects the Trump administration's request to eliminate funding for educator development and after-school programs. It rejects virtually all of the administration's school choice proposals.


The education secretary's widely-panned interview with "60 Minutes" triggered speculation that her job could be in trouble. But experts on both sides of the aisle doubt DeVos is in any danger.


Puerto Rico's legislature has approved a major education bill that will overhaul the island's educational system and pave the way for vouchers, as well as schools intended to resemble charters.


The tussle at the federal level comes during a tense time in education labor-management relations across the country.


The president's school safety commission will consist of four federal officials, but will meet with experts around the country, DeVos said.


"President Trump is committed to reducing the federal footprint in education, and that is reflected in this budget," Secretary of Education DeVos told members of a key House subcommittee.


Tangible school safety upgrades have gotten a lot of attention. But estimates show physical security improvements may not be cheap, or within the reach of cash-strapped districts.


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