The Obama administration is expected to seek $120 million in new money to help schools become more integrated, among other proposals in the fiscal 2017 budget.


President Barack Obama's upcoming budget is the first since the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act and could hold clues to its implementation.


States without waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act can come up with an alternative plan to support students in schools that have missed achievement targets.


Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, running for the GOP presidential nomination, has helped set the national K-12 agenda—and generated plenty of controversy in the process.


In its budget request coming out next week, the Obama administration wants new money to bolster job opportunities for young people, including high school students.


The department wants nominations for a "negotiated rulemaking" committee, according to a notice slated to be published in the Federal Register Thursday.


Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a GOP presidential hopeful, is a budget hawk who actually boosted education funding and still supports the Common Core State Standards.


Teachers' union leaders who put muscle and money behind Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton say they're not disheartened with her photo finish in the Iowa caucuses.


Danny Harris, the Education Department's chief information officer, has been counseled by the department about his actions, but isn't expected to receive further punishment.


The guidance includes ideas like ensuring tests are of high-quality and worth taking, and makes clear states and districts can use federal funds to support some of that work.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments