If you're rejecting the presumptive Democratic and Republican presidential nominees, here's a look at where candidates from some other parties stand on education.


We help you understand the ins-and-outs of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the law that replaced No Child Left Behind, through webinars, cheat sheets, and more.


Key changes under the Every Student Succeeds Act aim to help students who are transitioning out of juvenile justice back to traditional public schools, or trying to at least.


The "Dear Colleague" letter, dated Wednesday, says the persistent under-representation of girls and women in CTE programs can hinder the earning power in their careers, along with other harmful impacts.


At some point, the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is going to announce his pick for vice president. Let's take a look at where some prospects stand on education.


It's pretty easy to find wonky details about Hillary Clinton's K-12 resume. But what about some people who might join her on the Democratic ticket?


The Every Student Succeeds Act won bipartisan passage, but Education Secretary John B. King Jr. and Senate education committee Chairman Lamar Alexander have their differences on the law.


Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., talks about the development of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the regulatory process, and how education is playing out in the presidential race.


The chairman of the Senate education committee spoke with Politics K-12 about his role in getting the Every Student Succeeds Act over the congressional finish line.


The Every Student Succeed Act's Preschool Development Grants, which provided dedicated federal funding to early learning, are authorized for $250 million under the law,


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments