From the common core to gun-free school zones, developer and GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has made his views pretty clear about a few hot-button K-12 issues.


Today, the White House announced what it's calling an "ambitious, all-hands-on deck" initiative to get every student in the United States coding.


The Democratic presidential contender has worked to expand access to early-childhood education, boost academic standards, and improve child health—but her track record is mixed


States will get the chance to de-emphasize tests—in favor of other factors, like school climate—when they develop new accountability plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act. The Center for American Progress is out with a report on how to help K-12 systems use tests effectively.


Cole's background as a legal eagle could prove useful as the department begins to regulate on the Every Student Succeeds Act, with its new restrictions on the education secretary. Meanwhile, Lehrich has been a senior communications aide.


States without waivers won't have to set aside funding for tutoring and school choice, like they did under NCLB, as long as they support low-performing schools.


As a White House hopeful, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz epitomizes several Republican positions regarding education, particularly when it comes to the federal government's role in public schools.


Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Democratic presidential hopeful, has made big promises on college access, and been skeptical of standardized testing and Obama administration competitive grants.


John B. King Jr. says such programs need to think about the needs of students with disabilities, English-learners, working parents, and others in implementing a new workforce development law.


GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio has a longer record on college access than on K-12 policy, and wants to scrap the U.S. Department of Education and the common core.


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