Cole's background as a legal eagle could prove useful as the department begins to regulate on the Every Student Succeeds Act, with its new restrictions on the education secretary. Meanwhile, Lehrich has been a senior communications aide.


States without waivers won't have to set aside funding for tutoring and school choice, like they did under NCLB, as long as they support low-performing schools.


As a White House hopeful, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz epitomizes several Republican positions regarding education, particularly when it comes to the federal government's role in public schools.


Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Democratic presidential hopeful, has made big promises on college access, and been skeptical of standardized testing and Obama administration competitive grants.


John B. King Jr. says such programs need to think about the needs of students with disabilities, English-learners, working parents, and others in implementing a new workforce development law.


GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio has a longer record on college access than on K-12 policy, and wants to scrap the U.S. Department of Education and the common core.


The NEA gave high marks to ESSA's architects, and flunked both Republican presidential contenders in Congress, Ted Cruz of Texas and Marco Rubio of Florida.


The online comment period for how the U.S. Department of Education should regulate under the Every Student Succeeds Act closed Thursday; here are some highlights.


ESSA gives states, districts, and educators a chance for a "much-needed do-over" on teacher evaluation through student outcomes, says acting U.S. Secretary of Education John King.


"Common Core is out! Second Amendment is in!" Trump also told the crowd at a rally in Tulsa, Okla., on Wednesday.


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