Many of these folks have been working in the education department since the beginning of the Trump administration, but now they will have more formal, official roles.


Of the nine state plans released so far, at least five include—or plan to include—academic or extracurricular subjects beyond reading and math.


Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states have a lot of leeway in deciding what their long-term academic goals will be. A look at their goals reveals that states are taking advantage of that flexibility.


A number of advocacy groups and research organizations have—or are planning to create—some ESSA resources for states and advocacy groups.


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has talked up the section of ESSA that allows states to set aside 3 percent of their Title I money to promote "direct student services" including course choice.


Sources say lawmakers are seriously considering turning the law's Title IV funding into a competitive-grant program at the state level, at least temporarily.


The Secure Rural Schools program is designed to provide additional support for schools and local governments impacted by activities on federal lands and is linked to revenue from timber harvests on those lands.


One of the parts of the Every Student Succeeds Act that excited educators the most was the chance to look beyond test-scores in gauging school performance.


This is the secretary of education's third visit to school choice-friendly Florida, a state she recently described as a model for the nation on K-12 policy.


The states that submitted plans by the April 3 deadline take varied approaches when dealing with schools that fail to hit test-participation requirements in the Every Student Succeeds Act.


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