Amid the turnover accompanying the 115th Congress, you might have missed changes to staff investigative authority that affect the education committee in the House of Representatives.


In her third interview on conservative talk radio, the U.S. Secretary of Education also said ESSA "essentially does away with the notion of the common core."


The U.S. Secretary of Education's remarks in Washington came at her first public speech, where she celebrated magnet schools without committing to seeking additional funds for them.


Some Republicans say the education secretary's preliminary team is heavy on political hands and light on policy heft. Some would-be hires worry about working for a divisive secretary.


"We'll be examining and auditing and reviewing all of the programs," DeVos told the host of a Michigan radio program in a Tuesday interview.


A group of public, private, and home-school parents and educators met with President Donald Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos in a White House listening session.


These ESSA rules that are now on thin ice set the timeline for how schools are rated, measuring "consistently underperforming" groups of students, and other key issues.


In her first print and radio interviews since taking office, the new secretary of education opened to conservative opinion journalists about her rocky confirmation process.


Last year, Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., oversaw a federal spending bill for education in the House that cut the department's overall budget of $68 billion by $1.3 billion.


The Obama administration's accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act have been paused by the Trump administration, and they're are on thin ice in Congress. But U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants states to keep going on their ESSA plans.


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