The head of the senate education committee told governors at their annual convention Sunday that the reauthorized education act gives them wide latitude in shaping education policy.


Public school policy has not received a lot of attention in the 2016 race, even with Bush in the race.


The two new initiatives are part of the "Every Student, Every Day" campaign begun under President Barack Obama last year to bolster attendance.


The Every Student Succeeds Act won't be fully in place until the 2017-18 school year, when a new president and most likely, education secretary will be in charge.


The authors of the Every Student Succeeds Act tried to pare down the number of Education Department staff, but President Barack Obama apparently has other ideas.


The pediatric neurosurgeon and GOP presidential candidate has a plan touching on school choice and local control, but has also made waves his comments on school funding and other matters.


Clinton wants to encourage schools to create "School Climate Support Teams" in districts where a lot of kids are suspended or arrested in school.


Less than half of the officials who have led the department since its inception in 1980 were full-time K-12 classroom teachers at one point in their careers.


Previous iterations of the $1 billion grant program haven't been well received by Congress, though.


Acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. may not be "acting" in his role much longer. President Barack Obama officially nominated King for the post.


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