The two agencies looked at policies and programs that seem to be getting results in some school districts, and put out guidance to help districts and health care agencies collaborate.


Does the exchange in the debate mean the Common Core State Standards are back in the mix as a campaign issue? Maybe.


In our new story about the opt-out movement, there's one issue that we didn't explore: advocates' feelings on the race for the White House this year.


California, which has been something of a thorn in the Education Department's side in recent years, has some ideas for the shape of ESSA regulations.


President Barack Obama also made clear in his State of the Union address that he will fight to expand access to STEM courses, and the training and recruiting of good teachers.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, head of the Senate education committee, pledged to move fast if President Barack Obama nominates an education secretary, rather than continuing to have an acting secretary.


In past addresses, President Barack Obama has asked for more money for early-childhood education, ESEA reauthorization, and new provisions on college access.


The U.S. Department of Education is seeking input from a broad range of advocates, educators, associations, and the general public on regulating under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The Every Student Succeeds Act seeks to strike a balance between continuing protections for historically overlooked groups of students and reining in the federal government. What does that mean in practice?


Attention John King and Company: The American Federation of Teachers is not happy with the way that you are handling opt-outs in this new, post No Child Left Behind era.


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