Of the three stimulus-era marquee education-grant programs, Investing in Innovation is the only one enshrined in the Every Student Succeeds Act, though under a different name.


The House education committee weighs the issue at a time when some lawmakers are pushing to update the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA.


Negotiators were divided, at least rhetorically, about how far they should go in advancing equity vs. ensuring flexibility for local leaders under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Before and even after the new U.S. Secretary of Education was confirmed last week, many people assumed that he would be sticking around just for the next 10 months or so.


A team of negotiators kicked off regulations on "supplement-not-supplant" rules, and testing. But it's unclear from the conversation where the regulations will end up.


The Every Student Succeeds Act means many states will be rethinking their accountability policies and potentially broadening the definition of what counts as a successful school.


States are already rolling up their sleeves and moving forward on new accountability systems, even as the U.S. Department of Education begins crafting regulations for the new law.


Over 75 national and regional organizations are asking Congress to beef up funding for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants, which get about $500 million in President Barack Obama's proposed budget.


Duncan's official title will be managing partner for the Palo Alto, Calif.,-based philanthropy and advocacy organization, which is led up by Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.


The state requested a waiver from the federal requirement in January. Failure to meet the 95-percent requirement can lead to funding penalties for states.


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