Clinton said she'd like to create an "education SWAT team" at the U.S. Department of Education to help intervene in Detroit's struggling schools, as well as steer federal money to repairing and modernizing schools.


Later this month, negotiators will gather at the U.S. Department of Education to hash out regulations for certain parts of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


This may be the organizations' way of providing a kind of counterweight to another letter, from governors, state boards of education, teachers' unions and more calling for flexibility to be at the center of ESSA regulation.


Ohio Gov. John Kasich said he'd like to slim down the U.S. Department of Education, but didn't say whether he would bail out Detroit public schools.


A group of progressives, including leaders in the opt-out movement, sent a letter to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee this week recommending that its members not confirm King, whose nomination is slated for a vote next week.


Ever since the Every Student Succeeds Act was signed into law last December, policy wonks and others have wondered exactly how states would react to the new law


With a new administration, especially if it's of a different party, implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act could hit a few speed bumps or worse, one analyst says.


We've got a list of folks who have worked for the candidates in the past, or are working for them now, on education issues.


Districts in more than 30 states could lose some Title I funding if Congress adopts the president's fiscal 2017 budget proposal, says an unpublished Congressional Research Service analysis.


The education department billed the grant program's expansion as the federal government's latest move in a broad effort to boost the college and career prospects for American Indian and Alaskan Native youth.


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