What have states actually done in response to U.S. Department of Education feedback on their plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act? Here's Delaware's answer.


The U.S. secretary of education and her skeletal political staff will be spending the summer implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act, looking for regulations to cut, and more.


The Trump administration is sending some very troubling signals on civil rights, dozens of House Democratic lawmakers and seven senators wrote in a recent letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


There's been a ton of confusion lately about whether and how states can incorporate science, social studies, and other subjects into their systems for rating schools under ESSA.


Time already may be running out for U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to get a sweeping school choice initiative over the finish line this year.


States aren't necessarily keen to toss overboard what they put in their waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act when crafting their direction under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Will this round of feedback to a fresh group of states on their Every Student Succeeds Act plans give fans of local control yet another case of heartburn?


States will get an extra year to comply with new financial transparency requirements in the Every Student Succeeds that are aimed at shining a light on school district spending.


Even a speculative, dark-horse Zuckerberg run could have implications for education policy, in part because the Facebook mogul plans to pour billions of dollars into K-12 education.


We've put together a list of policy issues that the 115th Congress could at least in theory address, ranging from higher education to student data privacy.


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