If you've been wondering how many states had significant issues with test participation last spring, there's now an answer from the U.S. Department of Education.


The U.S. Department of Education sent a letter to states, warning that they need to be prepared to handle their testing opt-outs in 2015-16.


The department said the state must show that it is administering the same test statewide to students in grades 3-8 and high school by May 31, 2016, or else potentially lose a portion of the state's Title I funds.


The last eight states to get their plans approved are Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Louisiana, Oregon, South Dakota, and Texas, along with Puerto Rico.


The Every Student Succeeds Act contains changes to non-competitive Education Department formula grants, but the fiscal 2016 federal budget impacts when those changes will begin.


The Center for American Progress highlights the program's successes, but will future Education Department leaders embrace Race to the Top's competitive-grant model?


The U.S. Department of Education wasted no time in giving states initial guidance on transition from the No Child Left Behind Act to the Every Student Succeeds Act.


There's disagreement in the education policy world about whether (and to what extent) the Education Department should flex its muscles in crafting regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate education committee, says at least three major oversight hearings already are being planned on the Every Student Succeeds Act.


A portion of the Every Student Succeeds Act requires the department to reduce the number of full-time equivalent employees working on programs or projects within the next year.


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