A team of negotiators kicked off regulations on "supplement-not-supplant" rules, and testing. But it's unclear from the conversation where the regulations will end up.


The Every Student Succeeds Act means many states will be rethinking their accountability policies and potentially broadening the definition of what counts as a successful school.


States are already rolling up their sleeves and moving forward on new accountability systems, even as the U.S. Department of Education begins crafting regulations for the new law.


Over 75 national and regional organizations are asking Congress to beef up funding for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants, which get about $500 million in President Barack Obama's proposed budget.


Duncan's official title will be managing partner for the Palo Alto, Calif.,-based philanthropy and advocacy organization, which is led up by Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.


The state requested a waiver from the federal requirement in January. Failure to meet the 95-percent requirement can lead to funding penalties for states.


Groups including AASA, The School Administrators Association, the American Federation of Teachers, and the National Rural Education Association seek Title I funding at $450 million above the president's budget.


Negotiators will talk about interim assessments, computer-adaptive tests, and how to handle special populations. But some of the most interesting topics aren't part of the process.


The list already has its share of critics, both among advocates for educational practitioners and those who represent parents or particular groups of students.


"I do not want Mayor Emanuel's endorsement if I win the Democratic nomination," Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for president, said last week.


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