U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and I talked accountability, NCLB reauthorization, and the thing he wishes he had done earlier.


Fans of discussions about K-12 policy had little to cheer about Wednesday, but education did get occasional mentions from some of the GOP candidates.


Andrew Marcinek will be the first staff member at the agency ever to serve in the role. He will work out of the office of educational technology under its director, Richard Culatta.


The Common Core State Standards could get the most air time, but other issues have cropped up on the campaign trail since the first debate, such as teachers' unions.


For the past three years, Andrew has brought his signature blend of wonkiness and humor to Education Week's state coverage and to the State Edwatch blog.


With his poll numbers sagging in his presidential campaign, GOP Gov. Scott Walker vowed to end the National Labor Relations Board and reduce union power in other ways.


The president is unveiling changes aiming to give students information about how much aid they qualify for earlier and encourage more low-income students to go after federal grants and loans.


Did any of the nine-governors-turned-presidential candidates really have a stellar standout record when it comes to K-12 policy? The short answer is that there are no obvious superstars.


Education researchers are worried about proposed cuts to the Institute


Lauren Camera is leaving Education Week for the national education reporter's spot at U.S. News and World Report, and Politics K-12 will forge ahead.


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