John B. King Jr., the Education Department's top official, urges federal lawmakers to reauthorize the big career-tech-ed law, but few are optimistic that Congress will get it done any time soon.


Regulations for the "supplement-not-supplant" requirement will be up for discussion when Every Student Success Act Title I negotiators meet.


Many Republicans, and some Democrats too, might balk at the idea of a Washington-backed group rappelling into a school district amid pledges to help fix problems.


Acting Education Secretary John B. King Jr., told a conference of mayors and local officials that he plans to spend part of his time spotlighting school-improvement strategies.


Though he's yet to lay out a detailed K-12 platform, we know the GOP presidential candidate doesn't like the common core and thinks American students produce lousy test scores.


Clinton said she'd like to create an "education SWAT team" at the U.S. Department of Education to help intervene in Detroit's struggling schools, as well as steer federal money to repairing and modernizing schools.


Later this month, negotiators will gather at the U.S. Department of Education to hash out regulations for certain parts of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


This may be the organizations' way of providing a kind of counterweight to another letter, from governors, state boards of education, teachers' unions and more calling for flexibility to be at the center of ESSA regulation.


Ohio Gov. John Kasich said he'd like to slim down the U.S. Department of Education, but didn't say whether he would bail out Detroit public schools.


A group of progressives, including leaders in the opt-out movement, sent a letter to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee this week recommending that its members not confirm King, whose nomination is slated for a vote next week.


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