Over the weekend Hillary Clinton, a longtime charter fan, had some tough words for charters, specifically when it comes to equity. And that sent the internet into a bit of a tail spin.


The goals here include getting more in-depth and current information on what students know and can do than the schools would with traditional summative exams, and helping students tackle material in more meaningful ways.


The state is reluctant to mandate that all its districts adopt teacher evaluations that take student progress into account.


Juneau has emphasized graduation and teacher evaluation during her tenure, during which she's also said no to a waiver from NCLB but yes to a speaking spot at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.


The answer may well be yes, if you consider a report by the National Council of Teacher Quality, an advocacy organization that likes the idea of more rigorous evaluations.


Even though both the House and Senate ESEA bills keep annual tests, they go very different ways on a lot of other assessment issues.


States will continue crafting and implementing accountability systems that build on nine basic principles outlined by state education leaders way back in 2011, chiefs say.


Teachers, school administrators, principals and state officials have launched a digital ad campaign asking lawmakers to finish work to reauthorize the ESEA.


The administration is planning to create a $20 million pilot program that would allow high schoolers to use Pell grants to pay for college courses.


It's hard to imagine that Washington State—which is back under NCLB and not loving it—isn't feeling a little sore these days.


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