The GOP presidential hopeful and former Florida governor also talked about immigration at a town hall meeting Tuesday with high school students in Miami.


The theme is "Ready for Success" with a lot of emphasis on the bookends of the edu-spectrum: early and higher education.


For those states, results from tests aligned to the Common Core State Standards won't have an effect on school ratings, at least for the school year that just ended.


The Obama administration wants the so-called loophole in the federal HQT rules to be extended to ensure that alternative certification programs continue to supply teachers.


Want to know where the major presidential candidates stand on K-12 education? Don't go to their campaign websites.


For the Louisiana Democrat, the most important story in the wake of Hurricane Katrina is the enhanced equity in the New Orleans' education system.


The U.S. Department of Education has taken a politically symbolic step: It's officially said that states can offer alternate assessments only to the 1 percent of students who have severe cognitive disabilities.


Federal law requires each school to test at least 95 percent of its students or else the district or state could face sanctions.


Unlike last week's renewals, in which each state locked in generous three-year waiver extensions, this round of states secured only a one-year renewal.


A half-dozen White House hopefuls talked common core, teachers' unions, and the federal role in K-12 at a New Hampshire event. Here's an issue-by-issue roundup.


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