In the past, big-name researchers of traits like grit, persistence, and growth mindsets have all said such factors should not be measured for accountability purposes.


There's a test-participation requirement in the draft to reauthorize federal education law, but that doesn't tell the full story.


The compromise agreed to by a congressional conference committee is, in many key ways, a U-turn from the much-maligned No Child Left Behind Act.


In a conversation with state education chiefs, John King who will take over as acting U.S. Secretary of Education, said it's important they continue to push to close achievement gaps, improve teachers and raise learning standards.


The issue promises a bumpy road ahead, too, if the deal that sailed through a conference committee becomes law.


Check what appears to be at least a late-stage draft of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the name of the ESEA agreement set to replace the No Child Left Behind Act.


The state's original NCLB waiver was approved in 2012 for a two-year period, and the just-approved waiver extension is for one year.


The compromise gives states acres of new running room on accountability, while holding firm on NCLB's requirement for annual testing and data on at-risk students.


School districts and state officials have begged Congress to update the much-maligned No Child Left Behind Act, and it looks like they're on the verge of getting their wish.


The plans touch on issues ranging from teacher preparation to student-loan forgiveness, but questions remain on state implementation and U.S. Department of Education oversight.


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