The amendment would require states to identify and intervene in their poorest-performing 5 percent of schools and those that graduate less than 67 percent of students for two consecutive years.


Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., take note: Hillary Clinton had nice things to say about your bill to revamp the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


The move could pose problems for senators still finessing amendment language on the ESEA bill, such as Democrats who are working on proposals to beef up accountability.


As far as education is concerned, Walker is perhaps most prominent for his successful push to strip collective bargaining rights for teachers and other public employees in 2011.


Pressure rises, with nearly 150 amendments filed so far on the bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, though it's unclear how many will make it to the floor.


The American Federation of Teachers kicks off primary season by throwing its muscle behind the former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State.


Under the amendment, more states would gain Title I funding than lose it. But some that would lose funding would lose big time.


Duncan's children will attend the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, where he himself attended and where his wife will return to work.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., slammed the A PLUS amendment, knowing that if adopted it would have sunk his chances of getting the ESEA reauthorization across the finish line.


Delaware, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and South Carolina all had their waivers from provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act approved, but some got longer waivers than others.


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