Federal law requires each school to test at least 95 percent of its students or else the district or state could face sanctions.


Unlike last week's renewals, in which each state locked in generous three-year waiver extensions, this round of states secured only a one-year renewal.


A half-dozen White House hopefuls talked common core, teachers' unions, and the federal role in K-12 at a New Hampshire event. Here's an issue-by-issue roundup.


Save the Children, one of the oldest child-welfare organizations in the country, created a political action arm last year specifically to make early-childhood education a top issues among all candidates for the 2016 presidential campaign.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan blasted the Republicans' decision to slash the administration's Preschool Development Grant program, arguing it would pull funds away from states in the last two years of the grant.


The op-ed comes as Democratic presidential nominee contender Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., continues to draw tens of thousands of supporters to speeches across the country and is rising in the polls.


Both Maine and Michigan received three-year renewals of their NCLB waivers, meaning they won't have to request another during President Barack Obama's tenure.


The grants are expected to cover all but $12 of the cost of each AP test taken by qualifying students.


A group of 35 principals from the southern Wisconsin area wrote to Gov. Scott Walker arguing that in the current policy and political climate, districts simply don't have enough power.


The plan reflects several proposals gaining traction in Washington as Congress begins its process to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, including pushing states to invest more in higher education.


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