Title I funding would receive an increase after several years of flat funding, while charter schools, the National Assessment of Educational Programs, and Head Start would also see more money in the fiscal 2016 federal budget.


Data for the class of 2014 also showed that graduation gaps between white students and their black and Hispanic peers continued to close, even as each group's rate rose.


ESSA's regulatory process may be particularly tricky, since the law seeks to strike a delicate balance between handing power over to states and reining in the feds, while on the other hand ensuring there are some "guardrails" in place to help struggling schools and traditionally overlooked groups of students.


One of the lesser-noticed changes in the Every Student Succeeds Act concerns the $2.3 billion state teacher-quality grants program, also known as Title II.


So what do state superintendents plan to do with the new power they'll have under the Every Student Succeeds Act? And how much do they see accountability changing?


The Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, puts states and districts back at the wheel on teacher evaluation, standards, school turnarounds, and accountability.


You know you're looking at a bipartisan, compromise bill when everyone rushes the field after the final touchdown, claims partial credit, and proceeds to explain what it means.


Wednesday's big bipartisan vote marks final passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, and sends it to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it Thursday.


The Every Student Succeeds Act would include key Obama administration priorities, such as pre-K, but not others, such as dramatic school turnarounds and teacher evaluation through student outcomes.


With Congress poised to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, eyes are now turning to how congressional budget negotiations will impact K-12 aid.


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