Here's a look at the Senate and House bills to rewrite the NCLB law, and how they compare to each other, current law, and the Obama administration's waivers.


Passage marks a crucial step in getting a bill to the president's desk. The Senate and House can now begin conferencing their dueling reauthorization measures.


The U.S. Senate's bipartisan bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act doesn't go nearly far enough when it comes to accountability for low-income students and racial minorities.


Senators also rejected a high-profile amendment from Democrats to beef up accountability measures in the underlying bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


The National Education Association sent a letter Tuesday to senators urging them to oppose a Democratic amendment that would beef up accountability in the Senate's ESEA rewrite.


As debate continues on the bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, senators turned down proposals on three contentious issues.


The U.S. Senate voted down an amendment designed to protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students from discrimination and harassment in public schools. But such protections are already required under Title IX, the National School Boards Association said.


The administration has already played a huge role in shifting the federal role in monitoring states' progress towards turning around low-performing schools and helping struggling students.


The amendment would require states to identify and intervene in their poorest-performing 5 percent of schools and those that graduate less than 67 percent of students for two consecutive years.


Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., take note: Hillary Clinton had nice things to say about your bill to revamp the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments