Clinton counts herself a fan of dual enrollment programs' role in preparing students for college, and says there hasn't been enough investment in education.


Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and ranking member Patty Murray, D-Wash., have the difficult task of preserving the compromise bill they spent two months crafting.


Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who announced his candidacy for president Monday, is the third pro-school-choice, common-core-skeptical Republican senator to throw his hat in the ring.


Districts expect that financial considerations will be the biggest hurdle in sustaining Race to the Top reforms.


The measure plays to Republican sensibilities by allowing states to better coordinate federal education programs that already exist, including Head Start and the Child Care Development Block Grant and the Preschool Development Grant programs.


Education organizations are writing to the Senate education committee and pushing out policy critiques of the bipartisan No Child Left Behind rewrite in an effort to highlight their specific priorities for the legislation.


Senators on the education committee have until Monday at 10 AM to file their amendments, and with Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., promising an open markup process, there's likely to be a considerable number.


The former U.S. Secretary of State and first lady's record on teacher issues, standards, and early education could offer clues to her 2016 presidential edu-platform.


Chafee has been supportive of the Obama administration's education agenda; as governor, he oversaw the rollout of the state's $75 million Race to the Top grant and a $50 million early-learning grant.


The last time the Senate voted on a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act was when it debated the No Child Left Behind Act back in 2001, meaning most current senators have never cast a vote on K-12 law.


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