Education organizations are writing to the Senate education committee and pushing out policy critiques of the bipartisan No Child Left Behind rewrite in an effort to highlight their specific priorities for the legislation.


Senators on the education committee have until Monday at 10 AM to file their amendments, and with Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., promising an open markup process, there's likely to be a considerable number.


The former U.S. Secretary of State and first lady's record on teacher issues, standards, and early education could offer clues to her 2016 presidential edu-platform.


Chafee has been supportive of the Obama administration's education agenda; as governor, he oversaw the rollout of the state's $75 million Race to the Top grant and a $50 million early-learning grant.


The last time the Senate voted on a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act was when it debated the No Child Left Behind Act back in 2001, meaning most current senators have never cast a vote on K-12 law.


Education Secretary Arne Duncan used the 50th anniversary of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act's passage to emphasize education's role in bolstering civil rights and access to opportunity.


The shift in the definition of "core academic subjects" appears to be something of a response to the years-old debate about NCLB's curriculum-narrowing effect.


So far, states haven't shown a ton of interest in trying out a new School Improvement Grant model that relies heavily on evidence.


The Senate education committee is slated to mark up the bill April 14 when lawmakers in both chambers will be back in Washington after a two-week recess.


Add one more unabashed foe of the Common Core State Standards to the list of Republican presidential candidates: Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.


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