The seven senators argued that hearings would given the Senate education committee a chance to gauge nominees' backgrounds in issues such as higher education policy.


Changes to the law could have implications for districts in areas such as Medicaid, high-cost health plans, and coverage for some who work less than 40 hours a week.


A left-leaning Washington think tank issued a report last Friday, "Vouchers Are Not a Viable Solution for Vast Swaths of America," that examined the impact of a nationwide voucher program.


In just over two months, Congress must decide if it basically wants to punt on creating a regular fiscal 2017 budget, a decision could have consequences for K-12 spending.


Many students at St. Andrew Catholic School near Orlando take advantage of the state's tax-credit scholarship program, a form of school choice, which President Donald Trump strongly supports.


The resolution sponsored by Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., would repeal the regulations from late last year that govern how teacher-prep programs measure the success of their students.


A small group of former Obama political appointees who promoted Race to the Top, Investing in Innovation, and many of the former president's other greatest (or worst) edu-hits have put together a website, Education44.


Any federal measure to create Washington-backed education tax credits probably wouldn't go through the House and Senate education committees. That leaves open a couple of possibilities.


The Senate resolution and a similar House move aim to end now-paused regulations governing state ESSA plans and issues ranging from testing opt-outs to school turnarounds.


President Donald Trump championed school choice without delving into specifics during his first address to a joint session of Congress.


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