In this Q&A, the head of the country's largest charter advocacy group discusses what the recent Los Angeles school board elections mean for charter schools locally and nationally.


Although school choice was a clear winner in President Trump's proposed budget, many school choice advocates were hesitant in their support of the spending plan.


Very few states so far have outlined specific plans for charter schools in the early submissions of ESSA plans to the U.S. Department of Education, according to a new Education Commission of the States report.


Steve Zimmer, the recently ousted president of the Los Angeles school board, says the millions of dollars spent securing a pro-charter school majority on that district's board will embolden proponents of charter schools to do the same in other cities and states.


A new group called Save Our Schools Arizona is collecting signatures to put a referendum on the ballot to halt the recent expansion of Arizona's voucher program, which is scheduled to take effect in August.


A new majority of pro-charter members will now oversee the nation's second largest school district, long a battleground in the larger fight over the expansion of charter schools.


The outcome of the election that has attracted a windfall of outside spending will determine whether the Los Angeles school board tilts for or against more charters in the nation's second largest district.


A new poll finds most people know little about charter schools and private-school vouchers, despite the high-profile attention school choice has received under President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.


Charter school advocates are calling the bill "historic."


Online charter schools, which struggle nationally both with academic performance and student participation, are rarely shut down by the state regulators charged with overseeing them.


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