October 2013 Archives

Guest Column by Kim Farris-Berg Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) and Gallup published the results of their annual poll of "The Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools" back in August 2013, and one of the findings has been on my mind ever since. That is, 72 percent of Americans have trust and confidence in the women and men who teach in public schools. Among Americans under the age of 40, that number goes up: 78 percent trust teachers! That's an exciting statistic, and it was widely reported and celebrated. Yet it seems to me that, "Do you trust teachers?" is an ...


I support school choice - but it's complicated. I live in Washington, D.C., where almost half of the city's students attend charter schools. I helped launch a charter school here. My son attends another one, and the city is beginning to see some real collaboration between its charter schools and the district. Good things are happening. At the same time, I worry about what might happen if too many of us simply assume that the invisible hand of the modern school marketplace - or, worse still, the incentivizing hand of the modern school official - is a sufficient strategy ...


Guest post by Kimberlee Kiehl As I sit working in my D.C. apartment, shut out of our school at the Smithsonian because we are deemed "non-essential," I am thinking about how this phrase in many ways applies to how we see early learning in this country overall. This is my second go round in early childhood. I spent 12 years as a tenured professor teaching early childhood classes and running a lab school and then left the hallowed halls to be the COO at a large science museum. I came back to my first love -- early childhood -- ...


As this country's Battle of the Edu-Tribes rages on, I find myself increasingly disinterested in the slings and arrows of each side's successive character assassination, and increasingly excited when I come upon a school, a community or an organization that is focusing all of its energies on attacking the central challenge of the day: moving away from the one-size-fits-all Industrial-era model of learning, and toward, well, something better. Perhaps I've found a new ally in Daniel Coyle. Time will tell, but a recent blog post of his, "Four Lessons from the Future of Talent Development," gives me great hope. In ...


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