June 2011 Archives

The U.S. Department of Education has a new website to help future college students compare prices and see which school's tuition and fees have risen the most.


Community college has traditionally been the most affordable option for first-generation, low-income, underserved students. But with the cost of tuition going up faster than the rate of inflation, median family income declining, and wavering support from states, completion may be increasingly out of reach for many. That's the conclusion of a new report, "Affordability and Transfer: Critical to Increasing Baccalaureate Degree Completions," released today by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The report includes a state-by-state comparison of undergraduate enrollment at four- and two-year institutions, including a breakdown by minority groups. Forty-four percent of low-income students (those ...


Summer may not be the ideal time to visit a college because it can feel empty without students on campus. But the reality for families is that's when it is often most convenient. It's hard to get away during the school year when students are juggling demanding classes, studying for the SAT, working, and participating in activities their junior and senior years. There are ways to make the most out of your summer visit. A piece in the Charlotte News Observer includes some helpful suggestions. One is to schedule your visit during freshman orientation. Then you can get a glimpse ...


The College Board and Pearson unveiled a new online tool today to help students who struggle get up to speed with college-level courses


The validity of the ACT in predicting college success has come under scrutiny in a new paper out by the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Recognizing the dismal fact that half of all young men of color who graduate from high school will become unemployed, incarcerated, or die young, the College Board is launching a new effort to improve their prospects through education. Two reports released today by the College Board and Harvard University's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research underscore the need for a targeted initiative to help minority males ages 15-24. Educational Experience of Young Men of Color: A Review of Research, Pathways and Progress includes statistics on the plight of African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and ...


There is no one simple answer to the question: Why do students drop out of college? But a new study from the University of Western Ontario tries to shed new light. The study, "Learning About Academic Ability and the College Drop-Out Decision," found that 40 percent of low-income U.S. college students who left a four-year college program did so because of poor academic performance, despite the students' feeling they were prepared. The researchers, Todd Stinebrickner, an economics professor at the University of Western Ontario, and his father, Ralph Stinebrickner, a professor emeritus at Berea College in Kentucky, found many ...


You'd think that getting a bachelor's degree in three years would be appealing in today's tight economic times. But a front-page article in today's Washington Post says the concept has not caught on at colleges and universities. Students want to savor the college experience, despite the savings of thousands of dollars in accelerated programs. It will be interesting to see if the three-year path takes hold if students face reductions in Pell Grants or they find the amount of student debt they are amassing is burdensome....


A brief released today by the Institute for Higher Education Policy finds that in the last 10 years, low-income students have increasingly being drawn to proprietary colleges and now attend at four times the rate of other students. Students between ages 18 and 26 whose total household income is near or below the federal poverty level are likely to be overrepresented at for-profit institutions and underrepresented at public and private nonprofit four-year institutions, according to Portraits: Initial College Attendance of Low-Income Young Adults by IHEP, an independent, nonprofit public-policy research organization in Washington. Community colleges are the first choice for ...


At many colleges, getting admitted is not all about test scores.


The Education Department's new "gainful employment" rule is "modest" and may need to followed up by more aggressive legislation, says U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.


After a four-year experiment of letting applicants write essays as long as their hearts desired, Common Application is limiting essays to a 500-word maximum beginning this fall.


Students considering a for-profit college will now have a better picture of the value of their investment before enrolling with the release today of the Obama administration's final "gainful employment" regulations. In a statement from the U.S.Department of Education, it was announced that career colleges will risk losing access to federal student aid if they do not comply with the new standards, which will be phased in over the next four years. The goal is to provide students with information about the prospect for employment following graduation, so they don't fall into the trap that so many have ...


A new report released today by the Education Trust says that financial-aid policies too often benefit affluent students who would go to college anyway, rather than helping those with the greatest financial need. And when it comes to the bottom line of paying for college (after grants and aid), low-income students pay a higher proportion of their family income to attend than other students. "Priced Out: How the Wrong Financial-Aid Policies Hurt Low-Income Students" examines the "net price" of college (total cost of attendance minus total grant aid from all sources) using U.S. Department of Education data from 1,200...


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