August 2014 Archives

The set of grants by the U.S. Department of Education will help schools to hire counselors, social workers, and others, as well as support parent involvement and professional development.


As state officials and educators work on changes to the state's accountability system, just how to measure high school students' readiness for the world of work is being debated.


Washington Monthly magazine comes up with two new rankings this year: One for the most affordable elite colleges, the other for what it deems the worst institutions.


Among 2014 graduates, 73 percent of ACT test takers had completed a core college prep curriculum, helping them earn higher scores on the exam.


The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators launches new tools to help prospective college students find state resources to help pay for college.


ACT participation continues to grow, with 19 states now committed to giving the ACT to all high school juniors.


The average composite SAT score was 21 for the high school class of 2014 and a record 57 percent of graduates took the college-entrance exam.


Jon Whitmore, a former college president who has led the testing organization since 2010, will step down in August of 2015.


More organizations and higher education institutions pledge to work to improve college access as a new summit is scheduled at the White House for Dec. 4.


The College Board releases a full-length sample of its AP U.S. history test in response to criticism that it presents a negative view of American history.


With $28.5 million to states, the Advanced Placement Test Fee program is expected to serve up to 10 percent more low-income students in the spring of 2015 than last year.


A review of the Diplomas Now intervention model shows progress is easier in developing additional student interventions and supports than changing teaching within the classroom.


Michigan has set up 50 local college action networks to leverage community resources to get more students into college.


Increasingly, colleges are offering short-term academic programs on campus to expose high school students to careers.


A new study finds high school preparation and finances are key factors in college completion, dispelling notion that selectivity of a school is an advantage.


National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators releases 15 recommendations to change college reporting requirements for prospective and enrolled students.


New research finds that states and districts seeking to boost college and career readiness in STEM fields must work to ensure that more students are prepared for challenging courses.


Some of the organizations invited by the White House to make commitments to improve college access and completion for low-income students report on their progress.


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