An interesting disconnect between teachers and students about college readiness was revealed in the annual 2010 Deloitte Education Survey, released this week. While just 31 percent of high school teachers think their graduating seniors are prepared for college, 68 percent of current college students say they were prepared for college coursework during their first year. Still, about 28 percent of students surveyed had to take remedial classes to get up to speed. Other sources, such as the College Board, put that number as high as 40 percent. What then should high schools do to get students on a solid footing ...


To make their schools look even more selective, colleges love to publicize the number of applications they receive each year. Once they tell about the thousands of students who apply, they then share the small percentage of students they actually welcome to their campuses. Proclaiming just a 7 percent or 9 percent rate, colleges hope to make themselves look attractive and win the popularity contest among the best students. The Chronicle of Higher Education and The New York Times have a great collaborative story on the topic posted here. Check it out and share with high school students the concept ...


In the K-12 world, it's all about the teachers. Highly qualified ones are critical to student achievement. So, what does the teaching pool look like when students step foot on a college campus? More instructors are part time and more are women, according to a report by the National Center for Education statistics released this week. "Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2009, and Salaries of Full-Time Instructional Staff, 2009-10," shows that between fall 2003 and fall 2009, the proportion of full-timers fell across all institution types. Institutions reported employing approximately 3.8 million individuals in fall 2009, of whom about ...


If students are going to get those all-important college degrees, they need to be engaged on campus. That's why the results of the 2010 National Survey of Student Engagement released today are good for educators and policymakers to consider. Now in its 10th year, the NSSE measures the amount of time and effort students put into their studies and educational activities, as well as how colleges are providing resources to support those activities. It includes the responses of 362,000 first-year students and seniors attending 564 U.S. colleges and universities. The research looks at levels of academic challenge, active ...


Families can use all the help they can get when it comes to paying for college. Tax credits for higher education are a popular way to curb the cost. A new report calls for the federal tax credits for college expenses to be fully refundable and deposited into college savings accounts for Americans from low- and middle-income families when students are in the 8th grade. The report, "Enhancing Tax Credits to Encourage Savings for Higher Education," was released by the New America Foundation on Tuesday. Author Mark Huelsman suggests tax-credit changes designed to encourage savings and make college more accessible ...


Three thought leaders in public education offer their perspectives on what ails public education.


Tuition continues to rise at public four-year colleges and universities, according to numbers released by the College Board today. At the same time, however, record increases in federal grant aid will provide some relief.


Community colleges basked in the spotlight at the White House earlier this month, reveling in the important role the administration said they would play in the economic recovery. Yet that national publicity has not translated into more funding. Indeed, campuses are stretched, trying to accommodate record numbers of students with less money. And a report released today projects more of the same next year. Most states surveyed expects an increase in enrollment and a decline in operating budgets will likely be the norm next year, according to Uncertain Recovery: Findings From the 2010 Survey of the National Council of State ...


We can give students all the advice we want about the college-application process, but what they really listen to are other students. Now, a group of 45 students at Ivy League schools are offering their services as mentors to college-bound students through a new website called IvyAlly. Some of the advice is free; some requires a fee. "Our vision is to level the playing field in the admissions process and shift it from one that favors those whose parents can afford advice," says Greg Klimowicz, a junior at the University of Pennsylvania and co-founder of the new site. The idea ...


There has been lots of talk in policy circles about the value of students taking college courses while still in high school. In an effort to expand these opportunities, A Policymaker's Guide to Early College Designs: Expanding a Strategy for Achieving College Readiness for All has been developed by Jobs for the Future, a Boston-based nonprofit. Early-college designs adapt dual enrollment as a schoolwide strategy, focusing on unprepared, low-income students who may need extra academic support to get into and succeed in college. Often, it's the students already on track for college who are most likely to take college-prep classes. ...


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