Educators and policymakers are eager to know "what works" when it comes to helping low-income, underserved students graduate from high school and college. The College Success Foundation appears to have found some answers. The nonprofit foundation founded in 2000 in Washington state by Bob Craves and Ann Ramsey-Jenkins is a public-private partnership that provides mentoring, support, and scholarships for at-risk students in need. With programs in Washington state and the District of Columbia, the foundation has helped 11,000 students, providing some $107 million in scholarships and assistance. In its 10-year anniversary report released today, the foundation shares its success ...


Too time-strapped and daunted by the college search process to go it alone? Tired of nagging your child to decide on campus visits or study for the SAT? Looking to take some of the stress off the high school years? Enter the college consultant. For a package fee or by the hour, families can get advice for choosing the right high school courses, coming up with a list of potential colleges, preparing application packets, and navigating through financial aid. With the cost of college and competition going up, as well as the complexity of the process, the demand for consultants ...


Too many community college students are missing out on financial aid, simply because they aren't applying. A new report from the College Board and the American Association of Community Colleges shows that 58 percent of community college students who would be eligible for a federal Pell Grant applied in 2007-08 compared with 77 percent of those at four-year public institutions. It could be that tuition is lower at community colleges so students don't think they need aid. Or, community colleges are strapped for resources and find it challenging to do adequate outreach with financial aid. In any case, Pell Grant ...


As a nation, we're doing a better job at getting more kids into college. Where we could use some improvement is helping them graduate. Since 1970, college enrollment has grown nearly 35 percent. Yet completion rates have been flat, according to Complete College America, a national nonprofit working to change those figures. The organization wants to influence state policymakers to remove obstacles and redesign academic delivery to accelerate graduation rates. Today, the group is hosting a gathering in Nashville, Tenn., with representatives from 22 states to hash out ideas about how to graduate more students from college. The charter members ...


More kids are going to college, but it's much tougher for students who attend high-poverty schools. Study abroad is booming. And having a degree pays off big time in your paycheck. These are just some of the research findings in The Condition of Education 2010 report released May 27 by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). The congressionally mandated report provides an annual portrait of education in the United States, including early childhood, post-secondary education, student achievement, educational outcomes, and school environments. Here are some of the highlights for those interested in higher ed issues: • About 69 percent of ...


When parents and students are confused about the college-application process or how to pay for it, many go online for answers. The popular search engine Ask.com responds to 1 million questions every day and many deal with college. Here are the top-10 questions received by Ask.com about applying for college. They are ranked in order of frequency asked. If you have other answers, please chime in with a comment. 1. Is college tuition tax deductible? For 2009, you can deduct up to $4,000 of college tuition and fees paid for you, your spouse, or any other person ...


So, maybe there's no need for high school students to get stressed out about their SAT and ACT tests after all. According to The National Center for Fair and Open Testing, more colleges and universities are steering away from requiring applicants to submit SAT/ACT scores. Nearly 40 percent of all accredited, bachelor-degree granting schools in the county (843 in all) have test-optional policies. For a list click here. Four new institutions are announcing they will drop the testing requirement: Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pennsylvania; St. Michael's College in Colchester, Vermont; SaintAnselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire; and Southern New ...


Despite efforts to make college more accessible to low-income students, it's still a struggle. Check out the "5 Myths about who gets into college," by Richard Kahlenberg, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, in the Sunday Washington Post. It's disheartening to read the evidence that shows higher ed still has a long way to go in providing equal opportunity for all classes of students. For instance, 74 percent of students at the most selective universities come from the richest quarter of the population, and just 3 percent come from the bottom quarter. University leaders say they want socioeconomic diversity ...


To be ready for college or job training after high school, what should a high school graduate know? This month, a special commission was formed to look at just what skills students should have mastered once they leave high school. The hope is that the initiative will increase awareness of the need for high school grads to be academically prepared to compete in today's economy. The new group—the National Assessment of Educational Progress High School Achievement Commission—will be led by former Mississippi Gov. Ronnie Musgrove and composed of public officials, educators, and business leaders. It was created ...


With students wallowing in debt, defaulting on loans, and facing a bleak job market, some are questioning: Is college worth it? There is an interesting debate going on this past week on the topic—and one that will surely continue for some time. It started with an article Friday in The New York Times that quotes a small but influential group of economists and educators encouraging some students who are not ready or likely to be successful in college to skip it. Instead, they advocate intensive, short-term vocational and career training, through expanded high school programs and corporate apprenticeships. Part...


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