Do you feel for students who struggle to pay for college? Now there's an easy way to do something about it. Today, a new website debuted where you can click on the profile of a low-income student and pay anywhere from $1 to $2,500 toward his or her tuition. CO-Fund was established by an enterprising group of Brown University students led by 21-year-old Cody Simmons. Attending a large public high school in Florida, Simmons says he saw many students accepted to college who couldn't afford to go. This experience, along with his work with high-tech startups, inspired Simmons to ...


Maybe I was right to be skeptical of all the postcards that are flooding my mailbox with claims that SAT test-prep classes will boost my high school student's scores dramatically. On Wednesday, the Princeton Review dropped ad claims for test-score improvement through its test-preparation courses. It was a voluntary action that the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus found to be necessary and appropriate, following a challenge by Kaplan Inc., a competing test-preparation service. Kaplan complained the Princeton Review's score-improvement claims weren't based on improvement from one exam to another, but instead on the difference between ...


A report released today by the Economic Policy Institute paints a grim employment picture for 2010 high school and college graduates. The recession is to blame for the worst job market in a quarter of a century for young Americans, according to the report, The Class of 2010: Economic Prospects for Young Adults in the Recession by researchers Josh Bivens, Kathryn Anne Edwards, Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, and Anna Turner The unemployment rate for college graduates younger than 25 grew from 5.4 percent before the recession in 2007 to an average of 9 percent over the last year. And that doesn't ...


Big changes are happening in America's cities and the changes could have a major impact on higher education. Educators and policy makers can learn a lot from a new report released on May 9 by the Brookings Institution, State of Metropolitan America: On the Front Lines of Demographic Transformation. The information is a preview, of sorts, of the 2010 U.S. Census, pulling data from the annual American Community Survey. New realities highlighted in the report included: Cities are leading the way. Large metropolitan areas on the frontlines of demographic change, growing by 10.9 percent from 2000-2009 compared to ...


It's AP exam time in high schools across the country. So, just who is taking Advanced Placement classes these days? Are students getting college credit? How can you help your student ace the exams? I spoke with Sue Landers, executive director of the AP program for the College Board, for some insight. More than 30 college-level courses are now offered through the College Board's Advanced Placement Program and the demand is growing. Students know that having AP classes will help them stand out in the college application process, says Landers. Educators like that AP challenges kids and prepares them for ...


New numbers just released on student loan defaults reflect the tough economic times. The draft default rate on student loans rose to 7.2 percent in fiscal year 2008, up from 6.7 percent in 2007 and 5.2 percent in 2006, the U.S. Department of Education announced Sunday. Repaying student loans was toughest for borrowers who attended for-profit institutions (11.9 percent default rate). Those who attended public colleges had a default rate of 6.2 percent, and those from private colleges, 4.1 percent. Those who borrowed from bank-based programs had a higher default rate of 7.8...


With so many colleges to consider, it's easy to see why parents and educators rely on official rankings to help them decide. U.S. News and World Report is far better equipped than I am to sift through data from more than 1,800 colleges and universities to come up with its list of America's Best Colleges. Yet, it's important for readers to know how the list is assembled and to keep some perspective. A big factor (25%) of the U.S. News ranking is based on a reputation survey filled out by other college presidents, provosts, and admissions deans. ...


We know it's going to cost a bundle to send our kids to college, but many families aren't prepared. While most parents expect their children will go on to higher education, just six in 10 parents have saved for it, according to a 2009 Sallie Mae-Gallup poll. Earlier this week, we learned about how many students are saddled with high student-loan debt. A 529 plan is a great vehicle to save for college tax, but many don't understand how they work. Half of parents not using 529 plans say it is because they are not at all familiar with them, ...


It can be overwhelming for high school students to sort through all the choices to pursue after graduation &mdash and decide on what classes to take to prepare for the next step. Today, a new transition team approach pioneered by Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold, Maryland, is being recognized as an Outstanding Change Agent by the Maryland State Department of Education. The honor is one of several being given in Baltimore at the 2010 Career and Technology Education Awards of Excellence. Schools need this kind of extra support that AACC provides, as students face an array of options in ...


Today, the College Board released a report,"Who Borrows Most? Bachelor's Degree Recipients with High Levels of Student Debt" that looks at students who left campus in 2007-08 with more than $30,500 in debt—a total of 17 percent of college graduates. The report found that a growing minority of college graduates are borrowing too much and using the kinds of loans that are likely to cause them significant repayment difficulties. Highlights of the report include: -High debt levels are most common in students at for-profit colleges. Some 53 percent of graduates from for-profit colleges had more than $30,500...


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