Many are saying the amount of debt that students take on to attend college has become a national crisis. In an essay in Inside Higher Education, Michael Bugeja goes beyond lamenting about the situation to offer concrete steps that everyone can take to reign in the costs of getting a degree. Starting at the top, regents and trustees should be wary of "mission creep" and presidents need to raise money for student scholarships not just pay for new buildings, suggests Bugeja, director of the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication at Iowa State University. If provosts are intentional about how ...


This month, ACT is offering two free webinars to help educators better use data from ACT assessments to improve students' college and career readiness. For more information about the training on Jan. 26, click here....


Today, for the very first time, U.S.News and World Report released rankings for the best online bachelor's and graduate degree programs. To be included in the report, programs had to have at least 80 percent of their course content available online. The online bachelor's degree programs were ranked in three categories: student engagement and assessment, faculty credentials and training, and student services and technology. Master's programs online had similar categories but were reviewed for student engagement and accreditation, rather than assessment. For this first year, programs were not given a numerical ranking for overall program quality. Instead, schools ...


A new way to promote college readiness is being floated in the nation's capital: require all high school students to take the ACT or SAT and apply to at least one college or trade school. That's the latest proposal being discussed in the District of Columbia public school system and introduced by D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown. "I believe that every child should have the opportunity, even if they don't go, to at least apply to a college," Brown was quoted as he introduced the bill last week. He suggested that some D.C. students aren't going to college ...


Parents of today's college students were often hyper involved in their kids lives growing up—organizing play dates, coaching from the sports sidelines, and some would say hovering too much over their every decision. It's not surprising, then, that their desire to stay in tune with their children's lives continues into their young adulthood on campus. Rather than being annoyed by meddlesome parents, some colleges are embracing this generation's parental involvement, opening offices of parent relations and forming parent boards. An article in The Chronicle of Higher Education today written by administrators at Bradley University, a private, 6,000-student college...


Yesterday's recess appointment by President Obama of Richard Cordray to head the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was applauded by groups that advocate for student financial aid. With a director in place, the bureau can now exercise all its new powers under law. Student groups hope this means improving practices surrounding private student loans and credit cards and debit cards issued on campuses. US PIRG, a Washington-based nonprofit, issued a press release that calls the move a bold step to protect student consumers from financial tricks and traps. "Every year, students graduate owing tens of thousands of dollars before they've ...


Americans with a college education fare better in the job market than those with just a high school diploma or less—but just how much better depends on their field. A new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce released today finds unemployment for recent college graduates is 8.9 percent, compared with 22.9 percent of job-seekers with just a high school education and 31.5 percent among high school dropouts. Looking more deeply, the analysis finds that choice of major matters. Majors that are more closely aligned with particular occupations and industries tend to have...


With college applications mostly done, now high school students can turn their energy to how to pay for school. January 1 was the first day that families could fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. To get started, gather the following documents: Social Security card; driver's license; 2011 W-2 forms and other records of money earned; 2011 Federal Income Tax Return and any untaxed-income records; bank statements; current business and investment mortgage information, business and farm records, stock, bond, and other investment records; and if you are not a U.S.citizen, your alien registration or permanent resident ...


Despite a new federal requirement that colleges have a "net price calculator" on their websites, 272 institutions have yet to comply, and some calculators are hard to find. The assessment is provided by NetPriceCalculator.info, a new McLean, Va.-based company that tracks compliance with the mandate in the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 that went into effect on Oct. 29, 2011. Its website has a searchable database to link students to individual school calculators. Any postsecondary institution that participates in Title IV federal student-aid programs and enrolls full-time, first-time degree- or certificate-seeking undergraduate students must post a net-price ...


Looking back at the most-read College Bound posts of the year, you can see a range of issues. From policymakers to parents to educators, you were drawn to stories about applications and access, completion and jobs. So, a drum roll please.....The top 10 stories, as measured by hits on this blog, for 2011 were: 10. Common Application Essay Limited to 500 Words - Again. The move is a good way to force students to be more focused and disciplined in their writing, not to mention lightening the reading load for overworked admissions counselors. 9. Study Offers Insight Into What ...


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