Continued state budget cuts, increased enrollment, rising tuition, and lack of long-term planning paint a dim picture for higher education in a new report released today from the University of Alabama's Education Policy Center. "It seems like an almost impossible task to increase the college-completion agenda," says Janice Friedel, associate professor in the community college leadership program at Iowa State University and co-author of the report, Challenging Success: Can College Degree Completion Be Increased as States Cut Budgets? along with Stephen G. Katsinas of the University of Alabama and Mark M. D'Amico of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. ...


More students than ever are studying abroad, according to a recent report by the Institute for International Education. So, what does it mean to American colleges hosting international students? Students from around the world not only enrich the culture on campuses, they also enrich the local economy. NAFSA: Association of International Educators estimates that foreign students and their families contributed nearly $20.23 billion to the U.S. economy during the 2010-11 academic year. NAFSA's annual Economic Impact Statements estimates the amount of money foreign students bring to the United States to support their education, not including any multiplier effect. ...


Your odds of going to college and finishing are much greater if you are a woman and from a family with money. While not particularly a news flash to many, a study by University of Michigan researchers traces these trends back more than 70 years and documents growing gaps in attainment by income and gender. Gains and Gaps: Changing Inequity in U.S. College Entry and Completion, a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper by Martha Bailey and Susan Dynarski was just released. From a big-picture perspective, college entry has increased nearly 50 percent for Americans born between 1921 ...


President Obama is meeting with college presidents and higher education leaders today at the White House to talk about college affordability, access, and success, Inside Higher Education and UPI are reporting. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is also expected. The guest list is reported to include: Francisco Cigarroa, chancellor of the University of Texas System William E. (Brit) Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland Holden Thorp, chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Nancy Zimpher, chancellor of the State University of New York Freeman Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland Baltimore ...


While every state now has the ability to use data to guide education policy decisions, the reality is many don't still take advantage of it. The latest snapshot of state-by-state progress on information sharing, Data for Action 2011, was released yesterday by the Data Quality Campaign, a national collaborative based in Washington that encourages the use of data to improve student achievement. The DQC outlines what it calls 10 Essential Elements of Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems to measure how states are doing. In this seventh annual report, the DQC found 36 states have implemented all of the DQC's elements and ...


Talk of containing the soaring cost of college took center stage yesterday and today in a speech by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and in a hearing on Capitol Hill. Yesterday, Duncan spoke at the Federal Student Aid conference in Las Vegas and challenged colleges to do more to be innovative and efficient in the way they operate. In his speech, Duncan said containing the costs of college and student debt is some of the most controversial and thankless work in all of higher education. "There are no ribbon-cutting ceremonies and named chairs for college leaders who increase ...


Decisions, decisions. Many high school seniors are inundated with them right now. With transcript requests due this week, students need to finalize their list of colleges. For those with a strong favorite, there is the dilemma about whether to apply Early Decision II. A quick review of the terms: Early Decision I - Students apply to one top-choice school in the fall and, if chosen, enter into a binding agreement to attend. Early Action - Students send in their applications ahead of the normal deadline, and colleges let them know early if they are accepted, but the student does not ...


A report out today looks at just who is getting a college degree, offering schools insight into the factors that lead to success and ways to better serve students. Completing College: Assessing Graduation Rates at Four-Year Institutions by the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles, suggests looking beyond raw graduation rates as a measure of quality and take into account the types of students that enroll in various institutions. For instance, students at private schools have better graduation rates compared with those at public schools, but they also tend to be more academically prepared. First-generation ...


As I bumped into friends with college-age kids home over the long weekend, I found myself asking them if their children were exhausted. Many were. Others might have been tired, but still found time to go out with their high school friends to the wee hours of the morning much to their parents' chagrin. I remember collapsing over breaks at home, sleep deprived from late nights of studying—and having fun. Especially as a freshman, it was an adjustment to set my own schedule without anyone reminding me to get my rest. And, I didn't have a cellphone buzzing at all...


Word to the wise, parents: Your vision of the Thanksgiving holiday may be different from that of your high school senior or returning college student. While there may well be relaxing times feasting around the dinner table or watching a football game, your kids will likely have a different agenda now that they have either left the nest or are preparing to do so soon. For high school seniors, the last big round of college applications are due in just over a month so deadlines are looming. That is, perhaps, in your mind. Not necessarily theirs. If you haven't already, ...


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