Too often, college students take out private loans when federal ones have better terms. It's a problem that can cost students more in the long run and one that the government wants to address. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau published a Notice and Request for Information on private loans to help it prepare a report to Congress on private student lending. It is seeking information, including: Available information to shop for private student loans The role of schools in the marketplace Underwriting criteria Repayment terms and behavior Impact on choice of study and career choice Servicing and loan modification Financial ...


Just over half of community college students in a recent survey said they felt unprepared for the rigors of college-level work. The nonprofit Pearson Foundation and Harris Interactive asked current college students this fall about their experience in an online survey, and the results illuminate the need for improved college readiness. Students felt their high school could have done more by placing a stronger emphasis on basic skills (48 percent), offering more courses (52 percent) and offering more challenging courses (48 percent). Of the recent high school graduates surveyed, 71 percent say they are working harder in community college than ...


Just how much are college students hitting the books these days? The 2011 annual National Survey of Student Engagement found full-time students put in about 15 hours a week, on average. It depends on your major, however, and how much your professor pushes you. Engineering was more demanding, while business and social science majors had lighter workloads. The survey found faculty expectations for study time generally matched what students reported, but professors in some fields wanted students to study more, and students weren't always prepared for class even when they put in 20 hours. With the challenge of paying for ...


When young people are surveyed about the value of college, they get it. Overwhelming numbers realize that higher education is the path of the future for higher earnings and job opportunity. Studies reinforce the increasing need for a degree, the limitations of a high school diploma, and the pay boost of college, and the public agrees in polls. And as much as teenagers may grouse about tough classes in high school, many realize it's essential to be challenged if they are going to make it in college. This fall, the College Board released the findings of a survey of students ...


It's not as direct as getting a grant check, but it's just as real when it comes to cost savings for college: education tax benefits. Nearly half of American undergraduates cut their college expenses by an average of $700 by taking advantage of tax credit or deduction, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics yesterday. Looking at students in 2007-08, the NCES estimates 47 percent either saved money through the Hope tax credit, the lifetime-learning tax credit, or the tuition and fees deduction. These savings are traced back to ...


For all the talk of the value of a college degree, there are decent jobs for those with just a high school diploma. The problem is there are not enough of those jobs to go around, according to a report released yesterday by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The report, Career Clusters: Forecasting Demand for High School Through College Jobs, 2008-2018, produced in collaboration with the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education and the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education, analyzes 16 career areas and compares educational requirements and pay. It ...


It's increasingly a small world, after all, with news today of more students than ever studying outside their home countries in college. The Institute of International Education, a nonprofit organization in Washington, found a 4 percent increase in American students studying abroad in 2009-2010 over the previous year and 5 percent more international students coming to the U.S. in 2010-11 than the year before. The growth in U.S. students studying outside the country comes after a 1 percent dip in 2008-09. About 14 percent of U.S. undergraduates pursuing a bachelor's degree (230,752) participated in some kind ...


It was a busy week in international higher education circles. There was the forum of leaders from the European Union and the United States and these other global headlines: The Council of Graduate Schools released data showing international student graduate school enrollment in the U.S. grew by 8 percent in 2011. That was a significant gain, after five years of flat to 4 percent increases. The surge is likely linked to the continued double-digit growth in Chinese graduate enrollment. American universities are facing increased pressure from Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom for graduate students. The American Council on ...


Common themes on college completion challenges emerge at a U.S-European Union forum that brought together about 25 education officials from Europe and the United States.


A survey out today of young people ages 18 to 34 shows they embrace the value of a college education, but are frustrated with the rising cost of tuition and increased debt they take on to afford it. The nationwide, bipartisan survey was commissioned by the The Institute for College Access and Success, Demos and Young Invincibles, three national policy organizations. Young people agree (79 percent) that a college education and training are more important today than they were when their parents were growing up. Yet, 76 percent feel college has become harder to afford in the past five years, ...


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