What many think of as a traditional college student—one who lives on campus, attends classes full time, and doesn't need to work much—makes up only 25 percent of those in higher education today. Three-quarters of students are college commuters, often juggling families, jobs, and schools. Four in 10 attend part time. Outside of being an interesting demographic shift, this new normal on campus has significant implications for completion, according to a report, Time Is the Enemy: The Surprising Truth About Why Today's College Students Aren't Graduating and What Needs to Change, by Complete College America, a national...


A new curriculum being developed in Yale University's backyard aims to instill a college-going attitude in students as early as preschool, with students from pre-K through 8th grade spending one day a month focused on college-going skills, from goal-setting to financial literacy.


College admissions officers admit there is increasing pressure to recruit students with the ability to pay, according to a new, anonymous survey.


During the next decade, high school enrollment is expected to decline, while the number of students going to college will continue to increase. And more Americans will be completing postsecondary certificates and degrees, but not likely at the rate many hoped if the country is to become the world's leader in education attainment again. New forecasts released yesterday from the National Center for Education Statistics are merely projections, but they do help educators and policymakers craft strategies in anticipation of population trends. Among the highlights of Projections of Education Statistics to 2019: • The number of high school students in grades...


Nearly 80 new laws related to college completion have passed state legislatures so far this year, according to a new iniative tracking the issue.


Colleges are busy complying with a new federal requirement for a "net-price calculator" so students can get a better sense of the true cost of attending a particular institution.


To meet President Obama's goal to have the country lead the world in having the most college graduates by 2020, administration officials say every type of higher education institution — including Historically Black Colleges and Universities — need to ramp up completion efforts. To help achieve this, the administration is committed to increased federal funding and leveraging support of the private sector, philanthropies and alumni to support HBCUs, John Silvanus Wilson, director of the White House HBCU Initiative, told a gathering of leaders from that community in Washington this morning, To highlight the specific benchmarks for colleges, Wilson unveiled a new feature...


Two reports out this week reflect the tough financial reality that many colleges are facing in this economy and its impact on students.


While much of the reporting on college access and completion is on students who enter straight out of high school and proceed through graduation, the path is not that linear for many. Sometimes life gets in the way of a degree and students drop out just shy of a degree for personal, financial, or academic reasons. "Near completers" are considered students who have completed most of their course requirements and maintained their grades for a degree, but are short a few credits. The challenge of re-engaging these students and supporting them to the finish line of college completion was the ...


The SAT scores are in for the graduating class of 2011, and while more students than ever are taking the college-entrance exam, the performance of test-takers is down in every category. (See full story here.) The average SAT is now 1500, compared with 1501 for last year's cohort. Since 2007, critical-reading and writing scores have declined 4 points each, while math has managed to remain steady. The College Board attributes the dip to the larger, more diverse participant pool that includes more first-generation, ethnic and racial minority,and low-income students. Still, the downward trend in reading and writing is cause ...


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