As Hurricane Irene was predicted to hit about the time many college students were moving into dorms, it was interesting to see the varying responses from institutions. Some evacuated or delayed arrivals on campus, while others went ahead with the scheduled move-ins or left it up to families. I know of some students whose first night at school coincided with the arrival of the storm—talk about bonding with new roommates. The policies and communication with families apparent in this storm reflect the cultural differences and safety approaches on campuses. This experience underscores the need to dig a little deeper...


Hispanic student enrollment in higher education grew by 24 percent in one year, while the number of non-Hispanic white students enrolling in college fell during the same period.


Parents everywhere are sending their kids off to college this week. An estimated 3 million Americans are enrolled as freshmen this fall, according to the American Council on Education. Interestingly, the average age of the undergraduate student is 26, and women make up 57 percent of the student body on today's college campuses. Advice for parents of students fresh out of high school on how to handle this transition is plentiful. For today's parents, who have often hovered and tried to save their children from heartaches big and small, it can be difficult to let go. This can be especially ...


To deal with college expenses in this uncertain economic climate, a new survey reveals families are turning to lower-cost schools and seeking more financial aid. Students are also increasingly living at home and going to college part time. As a result, the average family reported spending 9 percent less on college in 2010-11 than the previous year. Sallie Mae, the financial-services company that specializes in education savings vehicles, released its fourth annual national survey, "How America Pays for College 2011" yesterday. More families took advantage of grants and scholarships to lower the overall cost of college. Sallie Mae found the ...


Hospitals and labs may be where the jobs are, but it's not where student interest lies. A survey of high school students conducted by Harris Interactive for the University of the Sciences reveals that 49 percent are "definitely or probably not" considering a career in science or health care—up nearly 9 percent from the year before. And among those 13- to 15-years-old, nearly 60 percent registered a lack of interest in the fields. Russell DiGate, provost at the University of the Sciences, a private college in Philadelphia, says he was surprised by the drop in interest over last year's...


If policymakers weren't wringing their hands enough about low college-graduation rates, now a new study puts a dollar figure on the lost income from young men and women who never complete their degrees. The American Institutes for Research, a behavioral and social-science research organization in Washington, analyzed nearly 1.1 million students that started college in 2002 and found nearly 500,000 dropped out within six years. From that, AIR estimated the difference in their potential earning power as college graduates vs. workers without a degree. (U.S. Census figures show young adults ages 25-34 earn about 40 percent more ...


A solid 69 percent of Americans say that having a college degree is "essential" for getting a good job in this county, a new study released by Gallup and the Lumina Foundation for Education yesterday revealed. And 95 percent of respondents think it's very or somewhat important for financial security. (The Lumina Foundation underwrites coverage of the alignment between K-12 schools and postsecondary education in Education Week.) This public support for the importance of higher education affirms the efforts of many policymakers and organizations to boost college going among Americans. "The perception matches reality. The public believes that to get ...


Women are not only enrolling and completing college in greater numbers than men, they also have a more positive view of the value of their experience, according to a survey from the Pew Research Center released yesterday. When asked about the job the higher education system is doing in providing value for the money spent by students and families, 50 percent of women who have graduated from a four-year college gave the system excellent or good marks compared with 37 percent of male graduates. Interestingly, while there is a strong feeling among the majority of Americans that a college education ...


Just a reminder to join me for a free Education Week webinar today at 2 p.m. EST to discuss access to college for low-income students. The presenters will be Jennifer Engle from the Education Trust and Traci Kirtley of Admission Possible. For more information or to register, click here....


When high school seniors think about applying online, many will turn to the Common Application for Undergraduate Admissions, which is accepted by 463 colleges. But there is a lesser-known avenue—the Universal College Application or UCA with 60 member colleges. Just as the Common App opened for the season on Aug. 1, the UCA went live on July 29 accepting applications for 2011-12. The UCA was launched in 2007 by ApplicationsOnline, a for-profit venture based in Baltimore. ApplicationsOnline was the tech provider for the Common Application's online service, but when its work was not renewed, the company decided to develop...


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