As schools look to improve everything from teaching to counseling to college and career readiness, students have a unique perspective—yet they are not always asked for their opinion. A national survey project called YouthTruth is trying to address that often-missing piece in the reform puzzle by asking high school students for their feedback. Started in 2008 with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the project has surveyed 71,000 students in 164 high schools across the country. It is expanding and next week begins recruiting schools for participation in 2011-12. (The Gates foundation also has provided funding for ...


A snapshot of recent college graduates shows the vast majority are employed, which is a good thing since two-thirds are in debt with average loans totaling nearly $25,000.


Amid talks over a deal to boost the federal debt ceiling, funding of Pell Grants remains uncertain, and efforts to fend off cuts are intensifying. Advocates have dubbed July 25 "Save Pell Day."


For 30 years, the United States has not been producing enough college graduates to keep up with the workforce demand, experts tell us. And as a result, the country is losing its edge as an economic world leader, and the income gaps between those with a college education and those without are widening. To turn things around, the country needs 20 million people to have some postsecondary education by 2025, according to "The Undereducated American," a report by Anthony Carnevale and Stephen Rose of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. This means 15 million would hold bachelor's ...


Despite the recession from December 2007 to June 2009, college enrollment increased, and more students were drawn to community colleges, according to a new report. The South experienced the greatest boost among high school students going to college, and even private colleges weren't hit particularly hard, with enrollment remaining steady. The report, "National Postsecondary Enrollment Trends: Before, During and After the Great Recession," published by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, looks at the pattern of first-time students ages 17-20 who began in the fall semester each year from 2006 thought 2010. While many of the expected trends were confirmed, ...


Although experts tell students to exhaust all their federal-aid options before considering riskier private student loans for college, a new report shows that nearly one in seven undergraduates across all types of colleges and programs used a private student loan.


There are mixed signals in the new figures that came out yesterday on financial aid that states give to college students. On the one hand, the survey by the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs (NASSGAP) shows that although overall support for higher education was down, states doled out 3.8 percent more student financial aid in the academic year 2009-10 over the previous year—a total of $10.8 billion. The amount of money spent on need-based grants grew faster than the amount spent on merit-based grants. Of the money awarded by states, about $8.7 billion...


When it comes to setting tuition prices, just how do policymakers decide what to charge? A new guide gives some behind-the-scenes insight about how colleges can manage costs and improve productivity. With the cost of college rising faster than the rate of inflation and students taking on increasingly more debt, many question what's driving the ever-increasing tuition hikes. Many chief financial officers are poised to raise tuition and fees again this year as they face dwindling state education funds. That backdrop makes this new paper released Friday,"Linking Costs and Postsecondary Degrees: Key Issues for Policymakers" published by the American ...


A new study shows that giving additional money to at-risk students can be a better investment than awarding it to those who are considered likely to complete a four-year degree.


Top college administrators' outlook on the economy and the plight of their institutions is fairly pessimistic, a new survey by the Chronicle of Higher Education and Moody's reveals. When nearly 500 college chief financial officers were asked about the economy, less than one third were more optimistic than a year ago, and 39 percent were more upbeat about the financial prospects of their own schools. To cope with lagging state funding and stretched resources, two-thirds of the CFOs surveyed reported raising tuition and fees by 3 percent to 6 percent for the upcoming year—and 21 percent raised those charges...


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