Summer is a smart time to start the scholarship hunt. Whether you are a high school senior looking ahead for funding as a college freshman or a returning college student hoping to find some additional support, there are plenty of organizations, foundations, and businesses out there giving money away for education—but they won't come to you. Students may be working hard this summer to earn money for college or study for college-entrance exams, but it might be well worth it to also set aside time to check out scholarships that could provide free money with only the investment of time...


Without a college degree, high school graduates are often discouraged about their future prospects and aren't aware of tools to help them turn their situation around. A new report shows 36 percent of high school graduates feel it is "very likely" they will be financially secure in their lifetime, while 55 percent of college graduates feet that way. When it comes to the first step to start funding a college education, just three in 10 high school graduates knew about the Free Application for Federal Financial Aid (FAFSA), compared with nearly seven in 10 college grads. The report, "One Degree ...


For students who are struggling academically or don't grasp the relevance of success in school, having a plan early on that links their courses to a career goal can make all the difference. One tangible way to lay out a pathway is with a "student learning plan." These plans are mandated in 23 states (and the District of Columbia), and legislation is pending in a handful of others in an effort to build student college and career readiness. A new policy brief out today from the Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, a nonprofit, independent education research organization in ...


The U.S. Department of Education has a new website to help future college students compare prices and see which school's tuition and fees have risen the most.


Community college has traditionally been the most affordable option for first-generation, low-income, underserved students. But with the cost of tuition going up faster than the rate of inflation, median family income declining, and wavering support from states, completion may be increasingly out of reach for many. That's the conclusion of a new report, "Affordability and Transfer: Critical to Increasing Baccalaureate Degree Completions," released today by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The report includes a state-by-state comparison of undergraduate enrollment at four- and two-year institutions, including a breakdown by minority groups. Forty-four percent of low-income students (those ...


Summer may not be the ideal time to visit a college because it can feel empty without students on campus. But the reality for families is that's when it is often most convenient. It's hard to get away during the school year when students are juggling demanding classes, studying for the SAT, working, and participating in activities their junior and senior years. There are ways to make the most out of your summer visit. A piece in the Charlotte News Observer includes some helpful suggestions. One is to schedule your visit during freshman orientation. Then you can get a glimpse ...


The College Board and Pearson unveiled a new online tool today to help students who struggle get up to speed with college-level courses


The validity of the ACT in predicting college success has come under scrutiny in a new paper out by the National Bureau of Economic Research.


Recognizing the dismal fact that half of all young men of color who graduate from high school will become unemployed, incarcerated, or die young, the College Board is launching a new effort to improve their prospects through education. Two reports released today by the College Board and Harvard University's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research underscore the need for a targeted initiative to help minority males ages 15-24. Educational Experience of Young Men of Color: A Review of Research, Pathways and Progress includes statistics on the plight of African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and ...


There is no one simple answer to the question: Why do students drop out of college? But a new study from the University of Western Ontario tries to shed new light. The study, "Learning About Academic Ability and the College Drop-Out Decision," found that 40 percent of low-income U.S. college students who left a four-year college program did so because of poor academic performance, despite the students' feeling they were prepared. The researchers, Todd Stinebrickner, an economics professor at the University of Western Ontario, and his father, Ralph Stinebrickner, a professor emeritus at Berea College in Kentucky, found many ...


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