There is a lot of angst among potential Pell Grant recipients and colleges as the fate of the federal student aid program hangs in the air..


For years, the Pell Grant program has received broad bipartisan support. But now, tremendous growth in the federal student-aid program at a time when politicians are looking for ways to trim the budget is leading to ramped up rhetoric. Among the most volatile criticism is coming from Rep. Denny Rehberg, R-Mont., who chairs the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education. Last week, he compared Pell Grants to "welfare" in a radio interview and questioned doling out money with no requirement for graduation. (See story and link to the interview in the Huffington Post.) President Obama's ...


Talk about college readiness often includes discussion of how much and what kind of math to take in high school. Today's Washington Post has a front-page story examining the push to raise graduation requirements to include Algebra 2. Those in higher education complain that students arrive on campus ill-prepared for college-level math because they don't take rigorous classes in high school—often skipping it as seniors, leaving a gap of a year in math instruction. Some 60 percent of new students at community college must enroll in developmental classes —often math—for no credit just to catch up. The Post article points...


Four new research reports are reflecting the growing success of early college high schools, an approach that has spread to 28 states with 230 schools and 50,000 students.


Low-income students make up just 15 percent of students at elite private colleges and flagship public universities—a number that has remained flat in recent years, despite efforts to boost the socioeconomic diversity of students, according to new findings. The Chronicle of Higher Education. looked at the country's wealthiest colleges, as defined by those with the 50 largest endowments, and the number of students on those campuses who received federal Pell Grants. The percentages were relatively unchanged from 2004-05 to 2008-09. (Most students who receive Pell Grants come from families whose annual household income is less than $30,000.) On 18...


This time of year many high school seniors are getting the long-awaited word from colleges about whether their application rose to the top of the pile or not. Applying to multiple schools may have seemed like a good idea a few months ago, but now the result may be multiple offers. How to decide? Step back and take a deep breath. Students generally have until May 1 to make a commitment and they should take their time to make a thoughtful decision, says Bill McClintick, director of college counseling at Mercersburg Academy in Mercersburg, Penn. "Unfortunately, many students make knee-jerk ...


College Board President Gaston Caperton announced today he will be stepping down on June 30, 2012. He has held the position since 1999. Caperton delivered the news at a meeting of the organization's Board of Trustees in Reston, Va. today. Under Caperton's reign, the College Board membership has grown from 3,664 educational institutions to 5,912. It also doubled the number of students it serves from from 3 million to 7 million last year. "The College Board was founded to expand access to higher education and we devote each and every day to advancing excellence and equity in education," ...


A new campaign to keep students in schools leverages this statistic: Every 26 seconds, a student drops out of high school in the United States.


If the United States is ever going to get to the goal of a 90 percent high school graduation rate by 2020, it is going to take some advocacy and innovation by state legislatures. That was the consensus among a panel of experts in education and policy in a discussion today about state-level strategies for raising high school graduation, college, and career-readiness rates at the Grad Nation Summit in Washington. The Civic Marshall Plan, developed last year as part of the Grad Nation initiative, aims for the class of 2020 to earn 600,000 more degrees than the class of ...


The number of U.S. schools with graduation rates no higher than 60 percent fell by 6.4 percent from 2008 to 2009, says a new report, which gives improvements by region.


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