June 2014 Archives

This week, Verizon announced the winners of its "Innovative App Challenge," a contest in which teams of middle and high school students design concepts for STEM-focused mobile apps to help people in their communities.


Gov. Malloy, a Democrat, has pledged $15 million to ease the implementation of the common-core standards. The money will go towards new school technology and professional development, among other uses.


Music, movement, and manipulatives, while fun, may hinder 1st graders struggling in math, study suggests.


A U.S. Education Department official overseeing the process tells state assessment officials to expect the initial draft this summer, and the final in the winter, after more input and public comment.


Last week, nearly 50 science and math educators from the University of Wyoming wrote a position paper directed to the board of education, which blocked adoption of the common science standards, detailing why they believe critics of the Next Generation Science Standards are wrong.


Google's gift is part of an initiative aimed at closing the gender gap in computer coding.


Tennessee points to a new law that rules out the use of PARCC exams in 2014-15.


The testing giant defends its won of a big PARCC contract, saying the protest by competitor American Institutes for Research has no merit.


At the annual National History Day competition going on at the University of Maryland this week, 3,000 middle and high school students showcased original historical research, presenting and defending their exhibits, papers, performances, websites, and documentaries for panels of judges.


Today the White House is hosting its first Maker Faire to showcase the efforts of children and adults who build, invent, tinker, engineer, craft, and create.


Only 53 percent of Americans have heard of the Common Core State Standards, and only two in 10 have heard a lot about them.


A group of churches in Wyoming released a statement saying it endorses the Next Generation Science Standards, including the stance that evolution should be taught as scientific fact.


A poignant new ad from tech giant Verizon suggests that how adults (ahem, parents) speak to young girls helps to explain the lack of women in STEM-focused careers.


Is it OK for young students to portray violent images in their art?


A small group of states wants to use PARCC and Smarter Balanced test items to make their own assessments. One has reached out to federal officials for clarification that test items should be freely available to all states.


Third graders in South Carolina who cannot demonstrate reading proficiency on a state test will be held back starting in the 2017-18 school year, according to legislation just signed by the governor.


The Palmetto State is fast-tracking its new standards so they're ready for legislative approval in January.


Psychology professors Sian Beilock and Daniel Willingham offer suggestions for how teachers can help decrease the effects of math anxiety.


A top official from the biggest common-core funder in the country says districts and schools should wait before basing teacher evaluations and student promotion decisions on tests based on the new standards.


This week, the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards released the final version of its voluntary national standards in dance, media arts, music, theater, and visual arts—and one coalition official said he expects nearly every state in the country to adopt them.


Fifty-eight percent of U.S. K-12 students live in states that are not currently planning to use common tests designed by the two consortia.


Despite her previous support for the Common Core State Standards, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signs a bill that requires the state to replace them with its own academic standards.


Even though South Carolina has jettisoned the common core, its new standards won't take effect until 2015-16.


The Kentucky education commissioner is scheduled to announce that the state will officially implement the Next Generation Science Standards this fall, but testing won't start for at least another year.


The instructional-materials market rose 4 percent from 2012 to 2013, raising hopes that the recession-battered business might be bouncing back. But sales in the first quarter of 2014 are down again.


A new federal report found that fewer graduates of rural schools completed a sequence of science courses than graduates of non-rural schools.


The president of the Association of American Publishers sees the uncertainty of common-core implementation as an opportunity for instructional-materials designers to improve their support of teacher and students.


A survey of 500 district superintendents and administrators across 48 states shows mostly strong support for the common-core standards, but it also finds concern that the standards are being implemented too quickly with insufficient support.


After 22 years as executive director and CEO of Alexandria, Va.-based ASCD, Gene R. Carter will retire June 30, the group announced today.


An official with the state education department in New Jersey confirmed that the state appears poised to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards next month.


Findings of three new studies suggest that some students may benefit from STEM-focused schools, but that, overall, they're not necessarily more effective.


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