July 2014 Archives

With common-core backlash high on the public radar, a 25-year-old poll seems to illustrate a big shift in public opinion. Or maybe not.


Americans are no good at math, but the common core will help only if teachers receive better professional development, according to a recent piece published in The New York Times.


Fourth graders are capable of using a computer to type, organize, and write well enough to be assessed, a federal pilot study finds. But whether a computer-based test can effectively measure their abilities remains to be determined.


Doubling up on math classes for a year may help middle school students in the short-term, but the benefits of doing so depreciate over time—and are likely not be worth the price of missing out on instruction in other subjects, according to a new study.


A Johns Hopkins University professor argues that high schools should stop teaching calculus, and instead teach computer science and statistics.


The U.S. ranked near the bottom in an exhaustive international comparison of educational innovation, but received high grades for use of assessments and parent engagement.


The College Board and Educational Testing Service have issued an apology about T-shirts bearing racially charged caricatures of Chinese politicians that were distributed at a grading event for the Advanced Placement World History exam last month.


Florida is the first state to adopt a set of standards developed by the Council for Economic Education.


At its convention in Los Angeles, the American Federation of Teachers approved a resolution calling for greater educator involvement in implementing the common-core standards.


Two resolutions floating around the AFT convention in Los Angeles offer very different positions on the common core.


The new schools chancellor in New York City is advocating teachers use the once-mandated citywide but since questioned (discredited, by some accounts) approach to reading instruction known as "balanced literacy."


New Jersey readopts the common core in math and English/language arts, while California adopts the first instructional framework based on the new standards.


On July 9, the New Jersey education department announced that the state board had adopted the common science standards, making it the 12th state to do so.


Students in a small district near Los Angeles will soon be required to take an ethnic studies course in order to graduate—a requirement some California legislators are hoping districts will adopt statewide.


Oklahoma's governor, who once supported the common core but later signed off on her state's bid to dump it, writes that her state can improve K-12 performance on its own.


Members of the teachers' union generally said they like the common standards, but lack resources and are scared about what testing will bring.


New Mexico's state purchasing agent, Lawrence O. Maxwell, has denied a protest of a major common-core testing contract that was filed by the American Institutes for Research.


Do typical arguments for why the common-core math standards are supposedly problematic really make sense?


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