August 2014 Archives

The state department of education has said nothing about what might happen to Lee County in the wake of its decision to boycott state-required tests.


When states have had problems with waivers from No Child Left Behind, it's usually been because of their teacher-evaluation plans. This time a state lost its waiver because it's standards weren't good enough.


A California science teacher has created visual representations that clarify the Next Generation Science Standards' cross-cutting concepts and remind students to connect big ideas in science.


After an emotional, there-hour hearing, the Lee County school district becomes the first to refuse to participate in state-mandated testing.


Reading instruction is making its way back into the public eye under New York City's new school chancellor.


The Kentucky education commissioner blasted the U.S. Department of Education in a recent blog post for rejecting his state's request for a one-year waiver on science assessments.


In a new set of guiding principles for assessment, the Vermont board calls on Congress to change the No Child Left Behind Act and embrace 'judicious' approaches to testing.


Tennessee students in grades 2-4 will be expected to learn cursive writing starting next year.


The PARCC consortium drops some items from its literacy test, saying that it could still test the standards sufficiently with fewer items.


The state is inviting the public to vote "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" on each standard, and to provide specific, detailed feedback.


A researcher and education professor at Michigan State University laid out his take on four major problems with how the common-core math standards are being implemented.


U.S. Education Secretary identifies bad tests, and too much testing, as key problems, but doesn't provide details yet on what the department might do about them.


As children make the transition from finger-counting to retrieving math facts from memory, their brains begin to change, according to a new study from Stanford University.


Revisions in the U.S. history framework have led to a reduction in multiple-choice items and the addition of a short-answer section.


Despite the many negative associations with automated essay-scoring, there's some evidence it may actually be more effective in changing student behavior than human scoring, Annie Murphy Paul wrote recently in the Hechinger Report.


A new poll from Education Next shows strong public support for the concept of shared academic standards, but much weaker support for the Common Core State Standards themselves.


The authors of the new AP U.S. History framework say that they were following the urgings of high school history teachers to design a course that would facilitate a more in-depth exploration of American history.


Since the common science standards were finalized in April 2013, 12 states and the District of Columbia have adopted them.


For the first time since it was established 78 years ago, the prestigious Fields Medal—viewed as the Nobel prize of mathematics—was awarded to a woman.


A survey by the Education Week Research Center finds teachers less than enthusiastic about the quality of their common-core professional development, and about the alignment of their instructional materials to the new standards.


How do you illustrate division of fractions by fractions? And why would you want to?


The College Board releases a full-length sample of its AP U.S. history test in response to criticism that it presents a negative view of American history.


The GOP blasts the College Board's new framework as "radically revisionist" and calls for a year's delay in using it.


Some companies, like Discovery K12, are actively marketing education publishing materials to parents who want to opt their kids out of the common-core standards.


Following accusations that questions on the New York standardized tests given this spring were developmentally inappropriate and included product placement, state education officials made half the questions available online.


The governor and state schools chief cite their desire for an assessment that's "the right fit for Iowa."


A new organization is wading into the (very choppy) waters of judging whether major textbooks and other classroom materials are common-core aligned.


A new study finds that boosting high school graduation requirements, alone, will not improve student outcomes.


Fourth graders struggled with some of the most basic functions on a computer-based writing assessment, according to a recent federal study.


The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium is using a crowd-sourcing element in its work to set the achievement cut scores on its tests.


A group of Maryland math educators take a close look at a 4th grade performance task, and several are surprised by the level of advanced thinking it requires.


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