October 2014 Archives

The National Science Foundation released a data tool today that puts STEM education statistics into a friendly, visual format.


The Antares rocket, which exploded just after takeoff in Virginia, was carrying a multitude of middle school science experiments.


The Million Women Mentor campaign has recruited 170,000 professionals to mentor girls in STEM fields in middle school through college, with a goal of 1 million volunteers.


As schools and districts struggle to find good-quality curriculum aligned to the common core, they're turning most often to their own teachers for those instructional materials, a new survey shows.


Governors should take steps to improve early-childhood mathematics education, including raising the bar for states' early-learning guidelines and promoting changes in teacher-preparation programs, according to a recent paper.


A project that trains teachers to review lessons and units for alignment to the common core has expanded its set of offerings.


The push to reduce the amount of time schools spend on testing originates in the White House, sources say.


New Hampshire is proposing an alternative to testing all students every year with the same assessment. If the U.S. Department of Education approves its pilot plan, it could send a powerful signal that more testing flexibility might be available for states.


Barbara Byrd-Bennett, the CEO of Chicago public schools, announced that she plans to ask the U.S. Department of Education to let the district hold off on a full administration of PARCC tests for another year.


The multinational energy corporation is launching an effort to improve science, technology, engineering, and math education and training in rural Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio.


Students in New York state will soon have the option to replace one of the history exams now required for graduation with a career-focused art or science exam.


Students who attended a live theater performance showed better knowledge of vocabulary words, more tolerance, and an improved ability to read others' emotions when compared to students who did not attend, according to a recent study.


The Center for American Progress released a report looking at how much time students spend taking state- and district-required tests.


Will a new accountability proposal from top education policy thinkers rise to the top of an increasingly crowded debate?


Pennsylvania's new kindergarten-entrance assessment is hobbled by insufficient training for teachers and weak outreach to educators and parents, a new report contends.


State school chiefs and urban district leaders committed to eliminating redundant tests, but they also made clear that they will not back away from annual standardized testing.


Anti-testing sentiment moves into the Washington policy world, but "solving" the testing problem means different things to different people.


Shelbi Cole, who has served as the director of mathematics for Smarter Balanced since 2012, has been promoted to director of content for the organization.


Massachusetts faces no consequences from its decision to let districts choose which test to give next spring, but when Colorado explored the possibility of doing the same, the U.S. Department of Education gave it no opening.


The Bay State will give districts the choice of using PARCC or MCAS this spring, even though the U.S. Department of Education said that doing so would violate federal law.


The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium's executive director steps down to become a technical advisor. The consortium's longtime chief operating officer becomes the new executive director.


The nonprofit is attempting to raise $5 million through the crowd-funding site Indiegogo to help introduce 100 million students to computer coding.


The decision puts teeth into an abstract promise: that the consortium's 11th grade "college ready" score actually connotes college readiness.


A survey of district superintendents finds that they increasingly see the standards as a potent way to improve students' skills. But many have not fully implemented the necessary curriculum and professional development.


Nearly 85 percent of Georgia teachers participating in a recent survey said they would rather use the traditional algebra-geometry-algebra 2 pathway for high school math than the integrated model the state currently requires.


In a recent survey, the Council of the Great City Schools found that half of K-12 parents in urban districts said the Common Core State Standards were beneficial to their children.


Teachers and academic scholars are debating ways to interpret, and teach, the text-complexity expectations of the Common Core State Standards.


Barbara Oakley, an engineering professor at Oakland University in Rochester, Mich., says the key to math expertise is practice, not conceptual understanding as common-core proponents would have educators believe.


The move follows up on the promise made by new Mayor Bill de Blasio to evaluate schools in a more holistic way.


A Stanford researcher's Venn diagram shows the overlap between the common core and the Next Generation Science Standards, which some are using to argue for standards adoption.


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