November 2014 Archives

A new report from PARCC shows that students found the field test in math more difficult than the one in English/language arts.


More than four out of every 10 students in a California district repeated Algebra 1, according to a new study, though not all repeaters were low performers.


President Obama announced that, in partnership with more than 200 companies and nonprofits, the administration has raised an additional $28 million to help prepare more science, technology, engineering, and math teachers.


Ken Burns, who has directed and produced documentaries including 'The Civil War' series, addressed 1,000 social studies educators.


Jose Antonio Vargas, who outed himself as an undocumented immigrant, praised educators who are "allies" to undocumented students and unveiled a high school curriculum on immigration issues.


Nearly all of the social studies textbooks that were being considered by the Texas board of education have been sanctioned for use next school year.


NCSS released a new book with exemplar social studies lessons designed by 15 curriculum partners, including the Library of Congress, and National Geographic.


Duncan said NAEP's role as a "truth-teller" helped catapult states into raising standards for students.


Code.org has tapped the popular Disney characters for a new tutorial as part of its campaign to promote computer science education.


The Texas state board of education did not grant preliminary approval for the series of social studies textbooks it was considering, which both liberal and conservative groups have alleged contain distortions.


Vermont's objection to reporting student scores by achievement level captures key points of the debate.


New research by ACT also shows that students' readiness for STEM studies lags behind their interest.


Teachers are encouraged to use the tasks, modify them to suit their needs, and offer feedback on needed revisions, according to standards organizers.


In this short audio post, two EdWeek reporters discuss the major differences between the common core and previous state standards, as well as a few other interesting tidbits from the recent common-core math report.


In a key step, the consortium decides on cut scores that are likely to cause sharp drops in the numbers of students reading and doing math at grade level.


L'Oréal recently announced the winners of its For Women in Science fellowship, which awards $60,000 grants to five female postdocs who've demonstrated excellence in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.


After lawmakers forbid the state from using the Smarter Balanced assessment in 2014-15, the state has come up with a solution that blends items from that test with those from a testing company.


The $108 million contract is the latest in a long series of assessment shakeouts in the wake of the Common Core State Standards.


Just because a state has a law requiring arts instruction doesn't mean students are actually getting it, said a group of arts education experts.


The AFT awards grants to two state unions in the wake of widespread criticism that teachers have been overlooked in the design and implementation of the common core.


Men haven't always dominated the computer-science field, according to NPR.


The aerospace and defense company Lockheed Martin will be donating up to $6 million to fund STEM programs at K-12 schools across several urban districts, including Washington, D.C.


A legislative task force considered a half-dozen options, but recommended the Smarter Balanced test for 2016-17. The state will continue to give the Iowa Assessments until then.


States in the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium have decided to take more time before approving a set of cut scores for the consortium's spring test.


Under the common core, there are many ways to do subtraction—none of which involve borrowing and carrying.


A former principal who has been gathering school artifacts dating back to the 1700s is giving most of his collection to the National Museum of American History, part of the Smithsonian Institution.


Feedback from states shows that most students didn't feel the test reflected what they were taught in class.


Superintendent John White announces that students in elementary and middle school will take the exam on paper, rather than on computer, this academic year.


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