December 2014 Archives

If in rounding out 2014 you're still finding yourself a bit fuzzy on the difference between the common-core standards and curriculum, two recent NPR pieces might offer some clarity.


A group of Cambodians who received art therapy to recover from postwar trauma began an arts education program that now serves more than 800 students.


We round up this year's most popular blog posts, and offer some projections for next year.


Some northern New Jersey high schools are dropping local midterms and finals in a bid to preserve instructional time.


The Denver school district looked fruitlessly for good common-core materials, reflecting widespread unhappiness with the quality of instructional resources in the marketplace.


Students would be better off if algebra teachers began their lessons with word problems, according to a recent study. But that can pose challenges for students who struggle with language.


A survey of kindergarten teachers showed unhappiness with the amount of time the test took away from instruction.


In case you missed it, a recently released package of opinion pieces looks at the many facets of K-12 arts education.


The first statewide results of ACT's Aspire test show most students below the marks that indicate they're on track for success in college.


Yet another state tries to hammer out a new way of judging schools that doesn't rely so heavily on test scores.


The Los Angeles school district will make ethnic studies a graduation requirement, and the San Francisco district will aim to do the same within five years.


A study of a program to prepare students for careers and college shows that students earn more credits in high school and have greater confidence in their career and life skills than their peers in regular programs.


A new bill would allow states to use grant money to reevaluate their testing routines.


The dismissed lawsuit claims that the Next Generation Science Standards violates the religious freedoms of students and parents and promoted atheism.


This week marks the second official Hour of Code, a campaign by Seattle-based nonprofit Code.org to get more students learning some computer programming.


Federal law requires states to report student test scores in achievement levels, but leaders in the Golden State want to take a different approach.


A recent study found that the path students take to earning a STEM degree varies widely, and that interest in STEM can be triggered across the age spectrum.


About 60 percent of job openings require basic science, technology, engineering, and math literacy, and 42 percent require advanced STEM skills, according to a new survey of 126 chief executive officers.


About 30,000 high school students in six states will take the first official round of common-core-aligned tests created by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers over the next several weeks.


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