January 2015 Archives

Created in response to concerns about too much testing, a task force suggests Colorado drop many of its high school tests but acknowledges that NCLB limits the state's options to curb tests.


Twenty-nine years ago today, seven astronauts—including Christa McAuliffe, who was to be the first teacher in space—lost their lives when the space shuttle Challenger exploded a minute after take-off.


In commemoration, 25 teachers from across the U.S. and 10 other countries spent four days traveling through Poland, visiting museums and historical sites in Warsaw, Krakow, and Oswiecim.


Fewer and fewer states are retaining control over districts' adoption of curricular materials.


Next year, Nashville public schools will begin the move from teaching Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II to teaching integrated math courses, which weave together concepts from each discipline.


The Wyoming House gave preliminary approval to eliminate a budget footnote that forbids the state board of education from considering the Next Generation Science Standards for adoption.


Assessment continues its uphill push for support, with recent outcroppings of opposition in Arizona, Indiana and Chicago.


Low-performing schools that implemented an arts integration program over two years showed improved attendance, fewer suspensions, and substantial gains in academic achievement, according to a new report.


President Obama's call for good career and technical education programs draws praise, and caution, from the field.


The Mississippi state board plans to seek a new test for 2015-16, but still plans to administer the PARCC exam this school year.


Yesterday the Arizona legislature passed a bill that will require students to correctly answer 60 of 100 questions on the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization civics test in order to graduate from high school.


Nearly 90 percent of arts education is funded by the government, according to a series of new reports from the National Endowment for the Arts.


A state senator proposes moving the 3rd grade reading test to 2nd grade to spread out the testing burden and allow 3rd graders more time for remediation.


The growing popularity of kindergarten-readiness tests risks sending messages that children are "lacking" even before they start school, early-childhood experts say.


As opposition to testing rises nationally, the NAEP offers a sharp contrast: it provides insight into K-12 education without imposing consequences on anyone.


The education secretary won't back away from policies the Obama administration has embraced from the get-go, a senior administration official has signaled.


A bill introduced in the South Carolina House would require that all public elementary, middle, and high schools provide instruction on the Second Amendment for at least three consecutive weeks each school year.


In a move that might prove to be illegal, the Colorado Board of Education voted yesterday to let school districts opt out of giving the first phase of the PARCC assessment.


The Council of Chief State School Officers urges Congress to pass a bipartisan revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that would keep the NCLB testing schedule intact.


Last month, West Virginia joined 12 states and the District of Columbia in adopting the Next Generation Science Standards—but not without first making a few tweaks to the standards' language about global warming.


One Florida school forbid students from flushing toilets during testing last spring, prompting a group of parents to organize in opposition to certain school practices during assessment.


There is little agreement among high school administrators on what computer science is, how it should be taught, and what kind of requirement it should fulfill, says a recent survey.


A recent Vox piece poses that STEM may be "too broad a classification" when looking at the job market. Does the same apply for education?


States are increasingly targeting teachers, rather than students, in their bid to boost 3rd grade reading-proficiency levels.


Publisher HarperCollins has pulled from shelves an atlas with maps that failed to include the state of Israel.


Criticism of the new movie offers teachers an opportunity to engage students in research and debate about its historical accuracy.


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