February 2015 Archives

A member of the common-core feedback group said that somewhere within the many drafts of the document the writers lost a geometry standard.


Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed a bill yesterday mandating that all public high schools in Arkansas offer computer science classes.


Starting next school year, Georgia high schools will have the option to ditch "integrated math" and go back to the traditional Algebra, Geometry, Algebra II sequence that teachers there have said they prefer.


The President announced yesterday that, starting in September, all 4th grade students and their families will have free access to national parks and other public lands and waters for a year.


New York state has been dating PARCC for several years now, but it sent signals this week that it's not ready to plan a wedding.


This week, the group that created the credit-card-sized computers announced that it had sold more than 5 million units.


The state's education commissioner also targets additional high school tests for elimination.


The bill from GOP Rep. Dan Fisher would ban the use of state funds on materials and activities related to AP U.S. History; Fisher said the course's framework "emphasizes 'what is bad about America.'"


This spring, Oklahoma middle school students who are taking advanced mathematics courses—i.e., Algebra I, Algebra II, or Geometry—will no longer be required to also take their grade-level math tests.


The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics may be starting to turn, according to new 2009 data from the National Center for Education Statistics.


Fourteen technology-based literacy programs from around the world were chosen to receive grants of up to $500,000 each, according to a recent announcement.


Lawmakers vote to delay the 3rd grade reading gate scheduled for this year, but many had second thoughts about their votes.


Hung-Hsi Wu, a professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, explains why instruction on fractions, which he calls "the backbone of school mathematics," needed to change.


A group that partnered in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards is now asking science teachers to help field-test multiple-choice items for an assessment on energy.


Last week, Republican state Sen. William Ligon introduced a resolution calling on the College Board to return its previous course framework.


More than half of U.S. students live in states that will not be administering tests by PARCC or Smarter Balanced this year.


The methods for doing addition and subtraction suggested by the common core may seem tedious at first, but proponents say they'll eventually lead to quicker mental math.


Every state has now decided what summative test it's using for the 2014-15 year: Check EdWeek's authoritative map of all the states' testing plans.


President Obama's proposed fiscal 2016 budget seeks big increases to support career and technical education, and to help states implement--and reduce--assessments.


Pushed by growing resistance to tests, two states draw a line in the sand and warn against skipping state-mandated tests.


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