May 2015 Archives

Georgia is revising its science and social studies standards and the revamp will likely bring a stronger focus on civics.


A Vermont public school teacher who takes her young students out to the woods for an entire school day each week may offer lessons STEM educators.


Students who are far from reading on grade level should not be expected to meet the higher expectations of the Common Core State Standards in a year or two, said literacy expert David Liben.


A physics website lauds the importance of arts education. It's not alone among the sciences.


Black and Hispanic students are driving some of the biggest gains at the high school level, and less dramatic improvements at the college level.


EdWeek got inside the operation and found out who's scoring the tests, and how they're being trained.


The South Dakota board of education has adopted a new set of science standards that look a whole lot like the Next Generation Science Standards.


Wisconsin lawmakers include a citizenship-test requirement for high school students in budget recommendations from their joint finance committee.


In response to criticism that its test is too long, and takes a major toll on school scheduling and personnel, PARCC announces a major redesign.


A new survey of parents and teachers shows how strongly they feel about music education and I pull out some of the more interesting points.


The Consumer Reports-style reviews of common-core instructional materials posted by EdReports.org are incomplete, contain errors, and misrepresent what's important in the common standards, claim two national groups of math educators.


Seventeen-year-old Raymond Wang of Canada won $75,000 in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair last week for inventing an air inlet system that reduces disease transmission in airplane cabins.


A new online resource offers a collection of student work to help educators see what students should be striving for.


Is it good 21st-century instruction to spend time teaching keyboarding and other computer skills? Or is it just another form of test prep?


A blogger discusses the value of studying student work.


Kansas legislators and the state board of education are trying a new tactic to increase financial literacy courses in schools: Ask nicely.


At a time when concerns abound about young people's lack of basic geography knowledge, we bring you some good news: Meet the winner of the National Geographic Bee.


Common-core backers seek a new audience for an old message: that states set the proficiency bars on their tests far too low.


The leap from decoding to fluent reading for many students is huge.


Mathematics education in the United States puts far too much emphasis on memorization, says Stanford professor Jo Boaler.


In the second major rollback in a few years, Texas allows seniors to graduate by passing three, instead of five, end-of-course exams.


A new report by GradNation reveals that although gaps persist, the nation is on track to reach an on-time high school graduation rate of 90 percent by 2020. The graduation rate reached an all-time high of 81.4 percent in 2013, the latest year data is available.


A week after the "nation's report card" showed no academic progress among 8th graders in U.S. history, civics, and geography, Education Week posts sample questions for readers to see how they would stack up.


Computer science courses are often inaccessible for black, Hispanic, Native American, and low-income high school students in California, according to a new study.


VH1 Save the Music Foundation works to put the "STEM to STEAM" discussion on the national agenda


David Ginsburg, of Education Week Teacher's Coach G's Teaching Tips blog, has a good explanation about what it means to "make sense of problems"—one of the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice.


A charity event May 16 will support Little Kids Rock, a national nonprofit that helps schools integrate modern-day music into lesson plans in order to make music education more engaging for students.


A veteran educator is stepping up to become executive director of the board that oversees "the nation's report card."


A few incidents of lax oversight have resulted in warnings or disciplinary steps.


A recent survey of 5,000 K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math teachers and supervisors found that 80 percent of respondents were familiar with the Next Generation Science Standards, and of those, 60 percent held a favorable view of them.


While born of an age-old concept, the "maker movement" officially turns 10 this year.


An Ohio school district revived cursive handwriting instruction by adding it to the art curriculum.


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