June 2015 Archives

In this Q&A, the authors of a new book discuss what good close reading looks like in classrooms, and why teachers shouldn't be afraid of it.


PARCC faces the loss of two states, but says it is optimistic it can maintain the test cost for remaining states.


Florida's governor vetoed funding for a financial literacy mandate, raising questions about the status of such efforts in that state.


New York and Kentucky, which gave common-core tests before other states did—and navigated the public reaction—share their experiences as dozens of other states get ready to do the same.


A 10-year-old boy wins the National You Be The Chemist Challenge. The event is aimed at getting students interested in chemistry and setting the stage for them to pursue it as a career.


Mark R. Nelson was named the new executive director of the nearly 20,000-member Computer Science Teachers Association.


"[K]ids aren't likely to buy into doing tougher math with teachers who are inwardly hyperventilating about the subject themselves," says a new brief from a New York City-based policy institute.


The Council of Chief State School Officers produces a new framework to help states move from theory to practice as they work to reduce the burden of testing on students and schools.


Students are expected to read more nonfiction under the common-core standards--but language arts teachers shouldn't be the only ones responsible for it.


With much support from educators, Arkansas has joined 13 states and the District of Columbia in adopting the Next Generation Science Standards.


The New York City education department released an updated K-5 science curriculum, to be implemented next year, that incorporate parts of the Next Generation Science Standards.


The National History Day competition showcases hundreds of student history projects. It runs through Thursday. We take you inside the competition.


Developmental psychologist Daniel Willingham says teachers should drop the reading reward systems and simply give students time in class for pleasure reading.


At least 1 in 5 West Virginia districts will go back to teaching the traditional algebra-geometry course sequence rather than integrated math courses, which the state initially required under the Common Core State Standards.


Today, the President announced the beginning of a National Week of Making, part of a larger initiative to get more K-12 and higher education students inventing, tinkering, building, and creating.


We compiled some educational resources to help you mark the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta, the document that became the basis for the U.S. Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.


The ongoing debate about whether the kindergarten common-core standards are "developmentally appropriate" doesn't take a basic question into account: Are most 5- and 6-year-olds capable of learning to read?


Our northern neighbor announced a national strategy for financial literacy education.


Unlike some other statewide programs, teaching students about organ donation hasn't helped increase the number of transplantations.


In response to criticism from the math community, EdReports.org, the group that bills itself as the Consumer Reports of common-core instructional materials, is making changes to its textbook review process.


The former executive director of the National Council of Teachers of English died June 7 after a long illness.


Connecticut lawmakers want to add lessons on banking, investing, and personal finance to financial literacy classes.


In an effort to increase the number and diversity of high school students taking computer science, the College Board will launch a new Advanced Placement course in fall 2016 that teaches a broader range of computing skills.


The state's new math standards are 92 percent in alignment with the common core, with a few notable exceptions in high school.


National Association of Scholars publishes an "open letter" criticizing the revamp of the Advanced Placement U. S. History framework.


New research out of the University of Kansas puts less emphasis on financial education and more on pairing it with real-life experience.


The Senate and House have both passed a bill that would require that Illinois high school students "successfully complete" a civics course to graduate.


A draft tool that educators, school districts, and publishers will eventually be able to use to see if their instructional materials are aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards is now available for public review.


A program that boosts arts programs at troubled schools is expanding for the second time.


Five years ago, the Common Core State Standards were issued, triggering an exhausting combination of celebration and criticism.


A bill that would establish computer science standards and create a computer science teaching endorsement in Washington state is now headed to Gov. Jay Inslee for his signature.


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