July 2015 Archives

The campaign seeks to teach 800,000 children to swim by the end of the year.


Revisions respond to intense criticism last year that the framework emphasized negative aspects of American history.


New Horizon's photos are helping Pluto make its way to center stage in and out of school.


In a new Education Week commentary piece, public radio reporter Monica Brady-Myerov argues that reading same-language subtitles can boost students' literacy.


Students who took music classes developed improved and lasting phonological skills that can translate to language abilities, new research finds.


A MOOC-provider teams up with the College Board to release materials aimed at students who are underrepresented in AP classes.


Last week, a U.S. team won the International Math Olympiad for the first time in 21 years. But the U.S. team, like many others in the competition, was all male.


A high school-themed television show is a finalist to promote science interest among young girls.


At a literacy conference where the majority of sessions were focused on practical application in the classroom, the term "common core" was sometimes circumvented, or explicitly avoided.


Having students do one- to two-minute writing prompts throughout the day can help build writing fluency and confidence—and is also an easy way to differentiate instruction, a K-6 literacy coach told ILA conference attendees.


The project, now five years old, gets students, classrooms, and authors connecting through technology while reading the same books.


The U.S. team won the International Math Olympiad for the first time since 1994.


At the International Literacy Association conference here, renowned reading expert Timothy Rasinski shared some of his favorite ways for developing students' foundational reading skills—many of which involve word play.


Starting today, about 6,000 educators, researchers, librarians, and experts are gathering here for three days of literacy professional development.


We profile a New York City high school where students have to explain and defend their ideas in major year-long projects in order to earn their diplomas.


The authors conclude that treasure hunts using GPS technology could energize the lesson plans of teachers across different subjects.


Common-core instructional materials are being used in all states, including those that the repealed or never adopted the standards, as well as internationally.


On Twitter, educators discussed their summer professional-development plans, and what they'd like to do differently in their classrooms this fall.


The Council for Economic Education will hold a session at its upcoming conference on "sneak-onomics"—how to use children's literature to teach economics: a Q&A with the presenter.


The Common Core State Standards teach students the algorithm for multi-digit addition and subtraction in 4th grade. But some experts say it should be taught sooner.


Virginia's class of 2015 is the first to graduate since financial literacy classes became mandatory.


A new study shows that many states have upped their standards for what it means to be labeled proficient, a change that some attribute to the advent of the common-core standards.


While male and female students are earning high school math and science credits at similar rates, boys are still significantly more likely to take engineering classes and to consider pursuing postsecondary STEM majors, according to a recent transcript study.


The National Education Association votes to oppose the use of PARCC and Smarter Balanced tests for teacher evaluation.


In an ongoing effort to help states navigate the process of reviewing, adopting, and implementing the Next Generation Science Standards, the National Association of State Boards of Education released a short report today profiling some states' efforts in this area.


Smarter Balanced test scores released by three states show that students are largely beating states' projections for student performance—except for on the high school math tests. Did experts warn us this was coming?


The National Science Foundation is offering grants to help teachers gain exposure and improve STEM education.


With less than 3 percent of U.S. residents trained in CPR annually, a new report recommends making such training a graduation requirement for students.


A new law in Wisconsin requires the state to examine high schools that sent more than six students to college who needed remediation.


EdWeek is looking to round up a new set of school district leaders for recognition in 2016.


Ron Thorpe, president and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, died today after a battle with lung cancer.


It's Independence Day. I've compiled a list of lessons to download and take to your picnic.


Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments

  • Linda: My problem with homework is they give too much and read more
  • Seo Article Writer: Hello I just see your site when I am searching read more
  • Car Insurance Guy: Ah!!! at last I found what I was looking for. read more
  • cyptoreopully: Hey there everyone i was just introduceing myself here im read more
  • Connie Wms: Good grief. We have gone round and round forever with read more